G/GJ tubes: Preventing and managing infectionGG/GJ tubes: Preventing and managing infectionG/GJ tubes: Preventing and managing infectionEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Stomach;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-03-26T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC);Holly Norgrove, RN, BScN​Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to keep your child's stoma healthy, and what to do if the stoma or surrounding area become infected.</p><h2>How to keep a healthy stoma</h2><p>To keep your child’s stoma healthy, you should:</p><ul><li><a href="/article?contentid=2536&language=English">Wash the stoma</a> daily with soap and water.</li><li>Allow the stoma to be open to the air.</li><li>Secure the tube well.</li><li>Avoid too much movement of the tube in the tract.</li><li>Address stoma leakage as soon as possible.</li><li>For a <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low profile tube</a>:</li><ul><li>Make sure your child’s tube is a proper fit.</li><li>Check the volume of the tube’s balloon weekly.</li></ul></ul><p>Despite your best efforts to keep your child’s stoma and the skin around it dry and clean, you may encounter some stoma issues with your child’s G or GJ tube, including infection.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Signs of infection include increased redness; change in colour, thickness and smell of discharge; swelling around feeding tube; abscess formation; pinpoint rash; pain; fever.</li><li>Always wash your hands before handling the feeding tube and the stoma.</li><li>Mild infections may be treated with over-the-counter antibiotics, while a prescription may be needed for more severe infections.</li></ul><h2>Signs of infection</h2><p>Your child may have a stoma infection if you see any of these signs:</p><ul><li>Increased and/or spreading redness of the skin around the feeding tube (it may look “angry”)</li><li>A change in the colour and the thickness of the <a href="/article?contentid=3020&language=English">drainage leaking</a> around the feeding tube </li><li>Foul smelling discharge from the stoma</li><li>Swelling and/or a feeling of warmth around your child’s feeding tube</li><li><a href="/article?contentid=792&language=English">Abscess</a> formation (collection of pus under the skin)</li><li>Pinpoint rash (may be due to a fungus)</li><li>Pain</li><li><a href="/article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a></li></ul><h2>Treatment of infection</h2><p>For mild infections with a small increase in redness and discharge, you may apply an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment or cream, such as polysporin, to the stoma.</p><p>If your child has any other signs of infection (spreading redness, fever and pain), have your family doctor or paediatrician look at the stoma and prescribe stronger antibiotics if necessary.</p><p>Prescription antibiotics that are used to treat the most common stoma infections are:</p><ol><li>A topical antibiotic such as fucidic acid. This is a cream that you will apply directly to the stoma.</li><li>An oral antibiotic such as <a href="/article?contentid=96&language=English">cephalexin</a>. This is a medication that your child will take by mouth or through the tube.</li></ol> <p>If the antibiotics are not working, your child will be sent for a swab of the stoma and may need to change the type of antibiotics that are being used.</p><p>An <a href="/article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a> may be necessary to diagnose an abscess.<br></p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><p> <strong>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</strong></p><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone: 416-813-7177</p> <p>Pager: 416-377-1271<br></p><p>Email: g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>

 

 

G/GJ tubes: Preventing and managing infection2906.00000000000G/GJ tubes: Preventing and managing infectionG/GJ tubes: Preventing and managing infectionGEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Stomach;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-03-26T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC);Holly Norgrove, RN, BScN​Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to keep your child's stoma healthy, and what to do if the stoma or surrounding area become infected.</p><h2>How to keep a healthy stoma</h2><p>To keep your child’s stoma healthy, you should:</p><ul><li><a href="/article?contentid=2536&language=English">Wash the stoma</a> daily with soap and water.</li><li>Allow the stoma to be open to the air.</li><li>Secure the tube well.</li><li>Avoid too much movement of the tube in the tract.</li><li>Address stoma leakage as soon as possible.</li><li>For a <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low profile tube</a>:</li><ul><li>Make sure your child’s tube is a proper fit.</li><li>Check the volume of the tube’s balloon weekly.</li></ul></ul><p>Despite your best efforts to keep your child’s stoma and the skin around it dry and clean, you may encounter some stoma issues with your child’s G or GJ tube, including infection.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Signs of infection include increased redness; change in colour, thickness and smell of discharge; swelling around feeding tube; abscess formation; pinpoint rash; pain; fever.</li><li>Always wash your hands before handling the feeding tube and the stoma.</li><li>Mild infections may be treated with over-the-counter antibiotics, while a prescription may be needed for more severe infections.</li></ul><h2>Signs of infection</h2><p>Your child may have a stoma infection if you see any of these signs:</p><ul><li>Increased and/or spreading redness of the skin around the feeding tube (it may look “angry”)</li><li>A change in the colour and the thickness of the <a href="/article?contentid=3020&language=English">drainage leaking</a> around the feeding tube </li><li>Foul smelling discharge from the stoma</li><li>Swelling and/or a feeling of warmth around your child’s feeding tube</li><li><a href="/article?contentid=792&language=English">Abscess</a> formation (collection of pus under the skin)</li><li>Pinpoint rash (may be due to a fungus)</li><li>Pain</li><li><a href="/article?contentid=30&language=English">Fever</a></li></ul><h2>Treatment of infection</h2><p>For mild infections with a small increase in redness and discharge, you may apply an over-the-counter antibiotic ointment or cream, such as polysporin, to the stoma.</p><p>If your child has any other signs of infection (spreading redness, fever and pain), have your family doctor or paediatrician look at the stoma and prescribe stronger antibiotics if necessary.</p><p>Prescription antibiotics that are used to treat the most common stoma infections are:</p><ol><li>A topical antibiotic such as fucidic acid. This is a cream that you will apply directly to the stoma.</li><li>An oral antibiotic such as <a href="/article?contentid=96&language=English">cephalexin</a>. This is a medication that your child will take by mouth or through the tube.</li></ol> <p>If the antibiotics are not working, your child will be sent for a swab of the stoma and may need to change the type of antibiotics that are being used.</p><p>An <a href="/article?contentid=1290&language=English">ultrasound</a> may be necessary to diagnose an abscess.<br></p><h2>Prevention of infection</h2><ul><li>Always <a href="/article?contentid=1981&language=English">wash your hands</a> before handling the tube and stoma.</li><li>Clean the G/GJ-tube site with soap and water daily.</li><li>Keep the G/GJ-tube site dry and open to the air.</li><li>Do not apply any dressing unless needed to absorb leakage or excessive discharge.</li><li>Prevent <a href="/article?contentid=3018&language=English">skin irritation</a> from excessive gastric content leaking from the stoma.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><p> <strong>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</strong></p><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone: 416-813-7177</p> <p>Pager: 416-377-1271<br></p><p>Email: g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>G/GJ tubes: Preventing and managing infection

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