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G/GJ tubes: Sensitivity and irritationGG/GJ tubes: Sensitivity and irritationG/GJ tubes: Sensitivity and irritationEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Abdomen;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-03-26T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC);Holly Norgrove, RN, BScN​Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to prevent sensitivity or irritation around your child's stoma, and what to do if irritation does occur.</p><h2>How to keep a healthy stoma</h2><p>To keep your child’s stoma healthy, you should:</p><ul><li><a href="/article?contentid=2536&language=English">Wash</a> the stoma daily with soap and water.</li><li>Allow the stoma to be open to the air.</li><li>Secure the tube well.</li><li>Avoid too much movement of the tube in the tract.</li><li>Address stoma leakage as soon as possible.</li><li>For a <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low profile tube</a>:</li><ul><li>Make sure your child’s tube is a proper fit.</li><li>Check the volume of the tube’s balloon weekly.</li></ul></ul><p>Despite your best efforts to keep your child’s stoma and the skin around it dry and clean, you may encounter some stoma issues with your child’s G or GJ tube, including sensitivity and irritation.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your child’s skin may be sensitive or irritated if it is red, scaly, dry or itchy.</li><li>Common irritants include a sensitivity to the tape that holds the G or GJ tube to the skin, acidic stomach contents leaking from the stoma, feeding tube movement, and infection.</li><li>Removing the cause of the skin irritation will help your child’s skin get better.</li></ul><h2>Signs of sensitivity and irritation</h2><p>Some children have sensitive skin and may be more likely to experience irritation around the stoma than other children. Your child's skin may be irritated if you notice:</p><ul><li>break outs around the stoma (tiny bumps or pimples)</li><li>rashes</li><li>blotches</li><li>the skin becomes itchy when exposed to an irritant</li></ul><h2>Causes of sensitivity or irritation</h2><p>Your child’s skin may get sore and red because it touches an irritant. The following are common irritants:</p><ul><li>A sensitivity or allergy to the tape that holds the G or GJ tube to the skin of the stomach</li><li>Acidic stomach contents leaking onto your child’s skin around the feeding tube</li><li>The feeding tube moving around too much in the stoma</li><li>The plastic of the feeding tube—this is rare.</li></ul><h2>Protection of your child’s skin</h2><p>The most effective way to treat irritation and sensitivity around the stoma is to make sure your child's skin is protected from irritants.</p><ul><li>If the irritation is caused by the tape used to secure your child’s tube to their tummy, change the type of tape you use.</li><li>Use a barrier tape. This is a layer of soft, spongy, flexible, waterproof tape that acts like a second skin. Stick the original tape that may be causing the sensitivity on top of the barrier tape to prevent it from hurting your child’s skin.</li><li>Use unscented skin care and laundry products geared toward sensitive skin. Look out for changes to your child’s skin if you change laundry products.</li><li>If you have trouble taking the tape off your child’s skin, put a wet face cloth over the tape for a few minutes before removing it or use adhesive-remover products (available at your local pharmacy).</li><li>If the irritation is caused by <a href="/article?contentid=3020&language=English">stoma leakage</a>, use barrier creams such as zinc oxide or other diaper rash creams to protect the skin around the stoma.</li><li>To help with skin inflammation, <a href="/article?contentid=790&language=English">dryness</a> and/or rash, Hydrocortisone 0.5% cream is available over-the counter at your local pharmacy. A stronger concentration (1%) can be prescribed.</li><li>You may use a foam or G tube pad in-between the stoma.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><p> <strong>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</strong></p><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone: 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager: 416-377-1271<br></p><p>Email: g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>

 

 

G/GJ tubes: Sensitivity and irritation3018.00000000000G/GJ tubes: Sensitivity and irritationG/GJ tubes: Sensitivity and irritationGEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Abdomen;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-03-26T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC);Holly Norgrove, RN, BScN​Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn how to prevent sensitivity or irritation around your child's stoma, and what to do if irritation does occur.</p><h2>How to keep a healthy stoma</h2><p>To keep your child’s stoma healthy, you should:</p><ul><li><a href="/article?contentid=2536&language=English">Wash</a> the stoma daily with soap and water.</li><li>Allow the stoma to be open to the air.</li><li>Secure the tube well.</li><li>Avoid too much movement of the tube in the tract.</li><li>Address stoma leakage as soon as possible.</li><li>For a <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low profile tube</a>:</li><ul><li>Make sure your child’s tube is a proper fit.</li><li>Check the volume of the tube’s balloon weekly.</li></ul></ul><p>Despite your best efforts to keep your child’s stoma and the skin around it dry and clean, you may encounter some stoma issues with your child’s G or GJ tube, including sensitivity and irritation.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Your child’s skin may be sensitive or irritated if it is red, scaly, dry or itchy.</li><li>Common irritants include a sensitivity to the tape that holds the G or GJ tube to the skin, acidic stomach contents leaking from the stoma, feeding tube movement, and infection.</li><li>Removing the cause of the skin irritation will help your child’s skin get better.</li></ul><h2>Signs of sensitivity and irritation</h2><p>Some children have sensitive skin and may be more likely to experience irritation around the stoma than other children. Your child's skin may be irritated if you notice:</p><ul><li>break outs around the stoma (tiny bumps or pimples)</li><li>rashes</li><li>blotches</li><li>the skin becomes itchy when exposed to an irritant</li></ul><h2>Causes of sensitivity or irritation</h2><p>Your child’s skin may get sore and red because it touches an irritant. The following are common irritants:</p><ul><li>A sensitivity or allergy to the tape that holds the G or GJ tube to the skin of the stomach</li><li>Acidic stomach contents leaking onto your child’s skin around the feeding tube</li><li>The feeding tube moving around too much in the stoma</li><li>The plastic of the feeding tube—this is rare.</li></ul><h2>Protection of your child’s skin</h2><p>The most effective way to treat irritation and sensitivity around the stoma is to make sure your child's skin is protected from irritants.</p><ul><li>If the irritation is caused by the tape used to secure your child’s tube to their tummy, change the type of tape you use.</li><li>Use a barrier tape. This is a layer of soft, spongy, flexible, waterproof tape that acts like a second skin. Stick the original tape that may be causing the sensitivity on top of the barrier tape to prevent it from hurting your child’s skin.</li><li>Use unscented skin care and laundry products geared toward sensitive skin. Look out for changes to your child’s skin if you change laundry products.</li><li>If you have trouble taking the tape off your child’s skin, put a wet face cloth over the tape for a few minutes before removing it or use adhesive-remover products (available at your local pharmacy).</li><li>If the irritation is caused by <a href="/article?contentid=3020&language=English">stoma leakage</a>, use barrier creams such as zinc oxide or other diaper rash creams to protect the skin around the stoma.</li><li>To help with skin inflammation, <a href="/article?contentid=790&language=English">dryness</a> and/or rash, Hydrocortisone 0.5% cream is available over-the counter at your local pharmacy. A stronger concentration (1%) can be prescribed.</li><li>You may use a foam or G tube pad in-between the stoma.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><p> <strong>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</strong></p><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone: 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager: 416-377-1271<br></p><p>Email: g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>G/GJ tubes: Sensitivity and irritation

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