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G/GJ tubes: Granulation tissueGG/GJ tubes: Granulation tissueG/GJ tubes: Granulation tissueEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Abdomen;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-03-26T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC);Holly Norgrove, RN, BScN​Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn what granulation tissue is, why it forms and how to treat it if you notice it around your child's stoma.</p><p>Granulation tissue (also known as hypergranulation tissue) is the new tissue that forms when a wound is healing. It is also the extra tissue that grows around the feeding tube. It is the most common skin issue that occurs in children with <a href="/article?contentid=2536&language=English">G or GJ tubes</a>.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Granulation tissue is the new tissue that forms when a wound is healing, and it’s also the extra tissue that forms around the feeding tube.</li><li>Granulation tissue typically looks pink to dark red; it appears open, shiny or wet; bleeds easily; appears puffy; can be painful.</li><li>Causes of granulation tissue include too much movement of the feeding tube, the stoma is wet, too much pressure on the stoma, trauma to the stoma, or an infection.</li><li>To prevent granulation tissue from forming, tape the feeding tube to the skin to prevent movement, make sure your child’s tube is the correct size, keep the stoma clean and dry, and prevent infections.</li><li>Granulation tissue can be treated with hypertonic salt water soaks, hydrocortisone cream, antimicrobial foam dressing, or silver nitrate.</li></ul><h2>Signs of granulation tissue</h2><p>Granulation tissue generally appears as follows. </p><ul><li>Usually pink to dark red tissue, but it does not spread like an infection</li><li>Can appear open, wet looking or shiny</li><li>Bleeds easily</li><li>Appears bubbly and puffy</li><li>Can be painful</li></ul><h2>Causes of granulation tissue</h2><p>Some reasons granulation tissue can form are:</p><ul><li>The feeding tube moves in and out of stoma. This can happen when a <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low-profile tube</a> is incorrectly sized.</li><li>The stoma is wet or covered with a dressing.</li><li>There is too much pressure on the stoma.</li><li>There has been trauma to the stoma.</li><li>There is an <a href="/article?contentid=2906&language=English">infection</a>.</li></ul><h2>Treatment of granulation tissue</h2><ul><li>Apply <a href="/article?contentid=2907&language=English">hypertonic salt water soaks</a> up to four times a day.</li> <li>Use hydrocortisone cream for a week to help with skin inflammation. Hydrocortisone 0.5% cream is available over the counter. You may be able to find hydrocortisone 1% cream over the counter but usually it is only available by prescription. Hydrocortisone is a short-term treatment so only use it for one week at time.</li><li>Use an antimicrobial foam dressing on the stoma. At SickKids, you can purchase AMD foam dressing from the Specialty Food Shop.</li><li>Use <a href="/article?contentid=2909&language=English">silver nitrate</a> to burn away the extra tissue and promote healing. You will be taught in the clinic first and then you can continue to apply the silver nitrate at home.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><p> <strong>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</strong></p><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone: 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager: 416-377-1271</p><p>Email: g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>

 

 

G/GJ tubes: Granulation tissue3019.00000000000G/GJ tubes: Granulation tissueG/GJ tubes: Granulation tissueGEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Stomach;Abdomen;Small IntestineDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-03-26T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC);Holly Norgrove, RN, BScN​Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Learn what granulation tissue is, why it forms and how to treat it if you notice it around your child's stoma.</p><p>Granulation tissue (also known as hypergranulation tissue) is the new tissue that forms when a wound is healing. It is also the extra tissue that grows around the feeding tube. It is the most common skin issue that occurs in children with <a href="/article?contentid=2536&language=English">G or GJ tubes</a>.</p><h2>How to keep a healthy stoma</h2><p>To keep your child’s stoma healthy, you should:</p><ul><li><a href="/article?contentid=2536&language=English">Wash the stoma</a> daily with soap and water.</li><li>Allow the stoma to be open to the air.</li><li>Secure the tube well.</li> <li>Avoid too much movement of the tube in the tract.</li><li>Address stoma leakage as soon as possible.</li><li>For a <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low profile tube</a>.</li><ul><li>Make sure your child’s tube is a proper fit.</li><li>Check the volume of the tube’s balloon weekly.<br></li></ul></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>Granulation tissue is the new tissue that forms when a wound is healing, and it’s also the extra tissue that forms around the feeding tube.</li><li>Granulation tissue typically looks pink to dark red; it appears open, shiny or wet; bleeds easily; appears puffy; can be painful.</li><li>Causes of granulation tissue include too much movement of the feeding tube, the stoma is wet, too much pressure on the stoma, trauma to the stoma, or an infection.</li><li>To prevent granulation tissue from forming, tape the feeding tube to the skin to prevent movement, make sure your child’s tube is the correct size, keep the stoma clean and dry, and prevent infections.</li><li>Granulation tissue can be treated with hypertonic salt water soaks, hydrocortisone cream, antimicrobial foam dressing, or silver nitrate.</li></ul><h2>Signs of granulation tissue</h2><p>Granulation tissue generally appears as follows. </p><ul><li>Usually pink to dark red tissue, but it does not spread like an infection</li><li>Can appear open, wet looking or shiny</li><li>Bleeds easily</li><li>Appears bubbly and puffy</li><li>Can be painful</li></ul><h2>Causes of granulation tissue</h2><p>Some reasons granulation tissue can form are:</p><ul><li>The feeding tube moves in and out of stoma. This can happen when a <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low-profile tube</a> is incorrectly sized.</li><li>The stoma is wet or covered with a dressing.</li><li>There is too much pressure on the stoma.</li><li>There has been trauma to the stoma.</li><li>There is an <a href="/article?contentid=2906&language=English">infection</a>.</li></ul><h2>Treatment of granulation tissue</h2><ul><li>Apply <a href="/article?contentid=2907&language=English">hypertonic salt water soaks</a> up to four times a day.</li> <li>Use hydrocortisone cream for a week to help with skin inflammation. Hydrocortisone 0.5% cream is available over the counter. You may be able to find hydrocortisone 1% cream over the counter but usually it is only available by prescription. Hydrocortisone is a short-term treatment so only use it for one week at time.</li><li>Use an antimicrobial foam dressing on the stoma. At SickKids, you can purchase AMD foam dressing from the Specialty Food Shop.</li><li>Use <a href="/article?contentid=2909&language=English">silver nitrate</a> to burn away the extra tissue and promote healing. You will be taught in the clinic first and then you can continue to apply the silver nitrate at home.</li></ul><h2>Prevention of granulation tissue</h2><ul><li>Always secure the feeding tube well to avoid friction against the skin.</li><li>Make sure your child’s <a href="/article?contentid=2908&language=English">low profile balloon-type G tube</a> fits properly. If you think your child’s balloon-type G tube is too loose or too tight, contact your G tube team to re-measure the size of the tube. Check the volume of the water in the balloon weekly.</li> <li>Do not put dressings on the stoma unless your medical team advises to do so.</li><li>Keep the stoma open and dry. Do not apply ointments or creams unless your medical team advises to do so.</li><li><a href="/article?contentid=3020&language=English">Manage leaking</a> around the tube.</li><li><a href="/article?contentid=2906&language=English">Prevent infection</a>.</li></ul><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><p> <strong>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</strong></p><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone: 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager: 416-377-1271</p><p>Email: g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>G/GJ tubes: Granulation tissue

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