AboutKidsHealth

 

 

G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blockedGG/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blockedG/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blockedEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Small Intestine;StomachDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-11T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC)Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what to do if your child's feeding tube becomes blocked.</p><p>If your child has a G or GJ tube, and it becomes blocked by formula or medications, it is important to try to unblock the tube as soon as possible. Leaving the tube blocked will delay or prevent food (i.e., formula), liquid, and medications from entering the stomach or jejunum (small intestine). The longer the tube remains blocked, the harder it may be to unblock.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If your child’s tube becomes blocked, it is important to try to unblock the tube right away.</li><li>If your child’s tube has an adaptor, remove it first to check if it is the cause of the blockage.</li><li>Use a pulsing push-and-pull motion with warm water to try to unblock your child’s feeding tube. If this does not work, contact your G tube specialist.</li><li>If you have a prescription for pancreatic enzymes and sodium bicarbonate, try this method if warm water does not work.</li><li>If your child has a low-profile G tube, first try to flush the tube via the feeding port before removing the tube and unblocking it manually. If this does not work, change the low-profile tube or insert a Foley catheter.</li><li>Prevent tube blockage by flushing with 5 to 10 mL water before and after you give food or medication, and every four hours during continuous feeds.<br></li></ul><h2>How to unblock a feeding tube</h2><p>There are two different ways to unblock a feeding tube at home. Try using warm water first. If that doesn’t work, you can use activated pancreatic enzymes.<br></p><h3>Using warm water</h3><p>To unblock your child’s G tube or GJ tube, you will need a 1 mL and 5 mL slip-tip syringe and warm water.</p><ol><li>Fill the 1 mL and 5 mL slip-tip syringes with warm water.</li><li>If your child’s tube has an adaptor attached to the end of the tube, remove it.</li><li>Connect the 1 mL syringe directly to the feeding tube.</li><li>Using a pulsing push-and-pull motion, insert as much water into the tube as possible. This thrusting motion will help clear out any formula or medication that has built up inside the tube. You may have to try this a few times to unblock the tube.</li><li>When the tube is no longer blocked, flush with at least 5 mL of warm water.</li><li>If you removed the adaptor to attach the 1ml syringe directly to the tube, re-attach it to the tube to resume feeds and medication administrations.</li></ol><h3>Using activated pancreatic enzymes</h3><p>If you cannot unblock the feeding tube with warm water, you can try using pancrelipase (a combination of pancreatic enzymes) and sodium bicarbonate. This mixture works very well when the tube becomes blocked with formula. You will need a prescription from your physician or nurse practitioner to get the pancreatic enzymes from pharmacy. Your G tube specialist (at SickKids, this is the G Tube Resource Nurse) may provide you a prescription as well.</p><p>When using the pancreatic enzymes, please consider the following:</p><ol><li>Pancrelipase is made from pork products. Cultural and dietary considerations must be considered.</li><li>If your child has an allergy to pork products, do not attempt this.</li><li>There is a possibility of skin irritation and redness if the pancreatic enzymes are left on the skin. When opening the capsule, be careful not to spill the contents on the skin. If you do, simply wash the area with soap and water right away.</li></ol><p>To use the pancreatic enzymes, you will need one pancrelipase capsule, one sodium bicarbonate 325 mg tablet, sterile or distilled water, and two 5 mL syringes (one to mix the medications and one to flush).</p><p>This is what you can do:</p><ol><li>Wash your hands.</li><li>Open the pancreatic enzyme capsule.</li><li>Crush the sodium bicarbonate tablet.</li><li>Mix the two drugs together with 5 to 10 mL of warm sterile or distilled water.</li><li>Push as much of the mixture into the tube as possible; then let it sit in the tube for 30 minutes.</li><li>Attempt to flush the tube with at least 5 mL of sterile or distilled water.</li><ul><li>If your child is younger than 1 year, only try this procedure once.</li><li>If your child is older than 1 year, you can repeat the procedure twice. If you are unsuccessful in unblocking the tube, you may repeat this procedure immediately after the first attempt. Ensure you aspirate all the remaining pancreatic enzyme mixture in the tube prior to pushing the new mixture.</li></ul><li>If the tube has become unblocked, flush with at least 5 mL of sterile or distilled water and continue with your feeds and medications.</li></ol><p>If warm water or activated pancreatic enzymes do not unblock the feeding tube, and if your child has a G tube or GJ tube that cannot be replaced by you at home, contact your child’s G tube specialist to have your child’s tube replaced in hospital.</p><h2>If your child’s low-profile tube is blocked</h2><p>Low-profile balloon type G tubes, such as the Mic-Key button or AMT MiniONE, rarely block because they are much shorter than other types of G tubes. Ensure the extension tubing is not blocked by flushing it with 5 to 10 mL of warm sterile water. If the extension tubing is blocked, replace it with new extension tubing. If you have been trained to change your child’s low-profile balloon type G tube, you may replace the feeding tube with a new one.</p><ol><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Use a slip tip syringe to deflate the balloon of the tube. Throw this water away.</li><li>Remove the tube from the stoma.</li><li>You may see a physical blockage in the tube. Use your index finger and thumb to squeeze the tube at the site of the blockage. Flush the tube with at least 5 mL of water to attempt to remove the blockage.</li><li>If you are successful at unblocking the low-profile G tube, and the tube is not broken, wash the low-profile G tube with soap and water, lubricate the tip of the low-profile G tube and re-insert it into the stoma. Once inserted, inflate the balloon with the amount of sterile or distilled water you normally use.</li><li>You will then need to check that the tube is in the stomach. Do this by attaching the extension tubing to the tube and pull back with a syringe until you see stomach contents flow from the tube. Once you see stomach contents, flush the tube with 5 mL of water.</li><li>If you are unsuccessful at unblocking the low-profile tube, or the tube is broken, insert a new low-profile G tube or a Foley catheter. If you have inserted the Foley catheter, contact your G tube specialist to arrange for the low-profile tube to be replaced.</li></ol><h2>How do you know if a feeding tube is blocked?</h2><ul><li>If your child receives a feed continuously via the feeding pump, the feeding pump may beep, saying there is an occlusion or flow error. This may be a problem with the pump, the feeding bag, or the tube itself.</li><li>If your child receives feed via gravity using a feeding bag, you may notice the feed stops dripping in the dripping chamber of feeding bag system.</li><li>When you are flushing your child’s tube, it may feel hard to push and only a small amount of fluid will go into the tube. This is a called a “partial blockage.”</li><li>When you are flushing your child’s tube, you may not be able to get any fluid at all into the tube. This usually means the tube is completely blocked.</li></ul><p>If your child’s G or GJ tube has any adaptors at the end of their tube, remove them and flush with water to ensure patency of adaptor. If you remove the adaptor and stomach contents flow back from the tube, your tube is not truly blocked. Rather, the adaptor was blocked and it can be washed or replaced. However, if the G tube or GJ tube does not flow back after removing the adaptor, this means the tube is blocked.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><h3>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</h3><p>Phone 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager 416-377-1271</p><p>g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>
Sondes gastriques (G) ou gastrojéjunales (GJ) : quoi faire si la sonde d’alimentation est bouchéeSSondes gastriques (G) ou gastrojéjunales (GJ) : quoi faire si la sonde d’alimentation est bouchéeG/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blockedFrenchGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Small Intestine;StomachDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-11T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC)Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Apprenez ce qu’il faut faire si la sonde d’alimentation se bouche.</p><p>Si votre enfant est muni d’une sonde G ou GJ et que les préparations ou les médicaments administrés ont fait en sorte qu’elle se soit bouchée, il est important de remédier à la situation le plus vite possible. Sans quoi, l’obstruction de la sonde empêchera ou retardera l’entrée d’aliments (par ex., préparation), de liquides et de médicaments dans l’estomac ou le jéjunum (petit intestin). Plus la sonde restera bouchée longtemps, plus il sera difficile d’y remédier.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>Si la sonde d’alimentation de votre enfant se bouche, il vous faut immédiatement la déboucher. C’est important.</li><li>Si la sonde est munie d’un adapteur, retirez-le en premier lieu pour vérifier s’il est responsable du blocage.</li><li>Exercez des tractions et des poussées en alternance sur l’eau chaude qui circule dans la sonde pour la déboucher. En cas d’échec, communiquez avec l’expert responsable de votre sonde G.</li><li>Si vous avez en main une ordonnance pour des enzymes pancréatiques et du bicarbonate de sodium, essayez cette méthode si l’eau chaude ne donne pas de résultats.</li><li>Si la sonde G de votre enfant est de type discret, tentez premièrement de rincer celle-ci à grande eau par le port d’alimentation avant de la retirer et de la déboucher à la main. En cas d’échec, remplacez la sonde discrète ou insérez un cathéter de Foley.</li><li>Afin d’empêcher que la sonde ne se bouche, rincez celle-ci à grande eau (de 5 à 10 ml d’eau) avant et après l’absorption d’aliments ou l’administration de médicaments et toutes les quatre heures pendant l’alimentation en continu.</li></ul><h2>Comment débloquer une sonde d’alimentation</h2><p>Il existe deux façons différentes de déboucher une sonde d’alimentation à domicile. Essayez d’abord d’utiliser de l’eau chaude. S’il n’y a aucun résultat, vous pouvez utiliser des enzymes pancréatiques activés.</p><h3>Utilisation d’eau chaude</h3><p>Afin de déboucher la sonde G ou GJ, vous aurez besoin d’eau chaude et de deux seringues à embout glissant, soit une seringue d’un millilitre et une autre de cinq millilitres.</p><ol><li>Remplissez les deux seringues avec de l’eau chaude.</li><li>Si la sonde de votre enfant comporte un adapteur lié à son extrémité, retirez-le.</li><li>Branchez la seringue d’un millilitre directement sur la sonde d’alimentation.</li><li>En exerçant un mouvement de tractions et de poussées, versez autant d’eau que possible dans la sonde. Le mouvement contribuera à libérer tout médicament ou préparation qui s’était accumulé dans la sonde. Il pourrait être nécessaire de procéder ainsi plusieurs fois pour débloquer la sonde.</li><li>Une fois la sonde débouchée, rincez-la à grande eau (avec au moins 5 ml d’eau chaude).</li><li>Si vous avez retiré l’adapteur pour fixer la seringue d’un millitre directement sur la sonde, remettez l’adapteur en place sur la sonde pour de nouveau vous en servir pour le gavage ou l’administration de médicaments.</li></ol><h3>Utilisation d’enzymes pancréatiques activés</h3><p>Si vous ne pouvez pas déboucher la sonde d’alimentation avec de l’eau chaude, vous pouvez essayer d’utiliser la pancrélipase (combinaison d’enzymes pancréatiques) et du bicarbonate de sodium. Ce mélange est très approprié lorsque la sonde est bouchée par la préparation. Vous aurez besoin d’une ordonnance émise par votre médecin ou infirmier praticien pour vous en procurer à la pharmacie. Votre expert en matière de sondes G (à l’hôpital SickKids, notre infirmier-ressource pour les sondes G fait office d’expert en la matière) peut également vous délivrer une ordonnance. Procédez comme suit avec les enzymes pancréatiques :</p><ol><li>La pancrélipase est produite à partir de produits à base de viande de porc. Vous êtes donc tenus de respecter les considérations éthiques et culturelles qui s’appliquent.</li><li>Si votre enfant est allergique aux produits à base de viande de porc, abstenez-vous d’utiliser des enzymes pancréatiques.</li><li>Des signes d’irritation et des rougeurs pourraient apparaître sur la peau exposée aux enzymes. En ouvrant la capsule, faites attention de ne pas en verser sur la peau. Si cela se produit, il suffit de laver immédiatement la surface de la peau à l’eau savonneuse.</li></ol><p>À cette fin, vous aurez besoin d’une capsule de pancrélipase, d’un comprimé de bicarbonate de sodium de 325 mg, de l’eau stérile ou distillée et de deux seringues de 5 ml (l’une pour mélanger les médicaments et l’autre contenant la solution de rinçage).</p><p>Procédez de la manière suivante :</p><ol><li>Lavez-vous les mains.</li><li>Ouvrez la capsule contenant les enzymes pancréatiques.</li><li>Broyez le comprimé de bicarbonate de sodium.</li><li>Mélangez les deux substances en y ajoutant de 5 à 10 mL d’eau distillée ou stérile chaude.</li><li>Versez la plus grande quantité possible de la solution dans la sonde; laissez-la y reposer ensuite pendant 30 minutes.</li><li>Essayez de rincer à grande eau la sonde avec au moins 5 mL d’eau distillée ou stérile.</li><ul><li>Si votre enfant a moins d’un an, cette pratique ne devra servir qu’une seule fois.</li><li>S’il est plus âgé, il est conseillé de ne le faire que deux fois, soit immédiatement après la première tentative si elle est un échec. Veillez à ce que tout le mélange d’enzymes pancréatiques qui reste soit aspiré dans la sonde avant d’utiliser du nouveau mélange.</li></ul><li>Si la sonde est débouchée, rincez à grande eau avec au moins 5 ml d’eau stérile ou distillée et poursuivez avec l’alimentation et l’administration de médicaments.</li></ol><p>Si l’emploi d’eau chaude et d’enzymes pancréatiques activés ne suffit pas à déboucher la sonde d’alimentation, et que vous ne pouvez vous-même remplacer la sonde G ou GJ à la maison, communiquez avec le spécialiste qui est responsable de la sonde G de votre enfant pour qu’elle soit remplacée à l’hôpital.</p><h2>Si la sonde discrète de votre enfant est bouchée</h2><p>Les sondes discrètes de type ballonnet, telles que Mic-Key ou AMT MiniONE ne s’obstruent que rarement parce qu’elles sont beaucoup plus courtes que les autres types de sondes G. Assurez-vous que la rallonge n’est pas obstruée en la rinçant à grande eau avec 5 à 10 ml d’eau chaude stérile. Si la rallonge est bouchée, remplacez-la par une nouvelle rallonge. Vous pouvez remplacer la sonde G discrète et à ballonnet que porte votre enfant par une sonde neuve si vous avez reçu la formation nécessaire à cet effet. </p><ol><li>Lavez-vous les mains à l’eau savonneuse.</li><li>Utilisez une seringue à embout glissant pour dégonfler le balonnet de la sonde. Jetez l’eau qu’elle contient. </li><li>Retirez la sonde de la stomie.</li><li>Il peut vous être donné d’observer le bouchon qui s’est formé dans la sonde. À l’aide de votre index et de votre pouce, pincez-la en appuyant directement sur le bouchon. Rincez la sonde à grande eau (avec au moins 5 ml) pour tenter de déloger le bouchon. </li><li>Si la tentative ne réussit pas et que la sonde discrète n’est pas endommagée, lavez-la à l’eau savonneuse, lubrifiez son embout et réinsérez-le dans la stomie. Une fois en place, on peut remplir le ballonnet avec la quantité d’eau stérile ou distillée habituellement prévue.</li><li>Vous devrez par la suite vérifier si la sonde se trouve bien dans l’estomac. Pour ce faire, fixez le raccord à la sonde et retirez le piston de la seringue pour aspirer un peu du contenu de l’estomac. Lorsque vous en apercevez, rincez la sonde à grande eau (5 ml d’eau).</li><li>Si vous ne réussissez pas à déboucher la sonde discrète ou que celle-ci est endommagée, mettez en place une nouvelle sonde G discrète ou un cathéter de Foley, dans lequel cas vous devrez communiquer avec l’expert de votre sonde G concernant le remplacement de la sonde en question.</li></ol><h2>Comment savez-vous qu’une sonde d’alimentation est bouchée?</h2><ul><li>Si votre enfant est alimenté continuellement au moyen d’une pompe d’alimentation, celle-ci peut émettre un signal sonore pour indiquer la présence d’une occlusion ou une erreur de mesure du débit. Un problème occasionné par la pompe, le sac d’alimentation ou la sonde elle-même peut aussi en être l’origine.</li><li>Si votre enfant est nourri par gravité à l’aide d’un sac d’alimentation, vous pourriez remarquer que la solution cesse de dégoutter dans la chambre compte-gouttes du système.</li><li>Lorsque vous rincez la sonde à grande eau, si celle-ci peut difficilement y pénétrer et que seule une petite quantité de liquide y réside, il s’agit d’un « blocage partiel ».</li><li>Si lors du rinçage à grande eau, la sonde reste à sec, il s’agit alors d’un « blocage total ».</li></ul><p>Si la sonde G ou GJ de votre enfant comporte un ou des adapteurs à son extrémité, retirez-les et rincez-les à grande eau pour vous assurer de leur perméabilité. Si vous retirez l’adapteur et que le contenu de l’estomac rejaillit de la sonde, celle-ci n’est pas réellement bloquée. C’est l’adapteur qui était vraisemblablement bloqué et il peut être nettoyé ou remplacé. Si vous observez la situation inverse, c’est-à-dire que le contenu de l’estomac ne rejaillit pas de la sonde, la sonde est bloquée.</p><h2>À l’hôpital SickKids</h2><p>Si votre enfant est un patient de SickKids, communiquez avec l’infirmier-ressource pour les sondes G en cas de préoccupations quelconques.</p><h3>Coordonnées de l’infirmier-ressource :</h3><p>Numéro de téléphone : 416 813 7177</p><p>Téléavertisseur : 416 377 1271</p><p>g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>Après les heures de travail ou pendant les fins de semaine, il faudra vous présenter au sevice des urgences pour obtenir une méthode de rechange pour l’alimentation et l’administration de médicaments et de liquides.</p>

 

 

G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blocked3039.00000000000G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blockedG/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blockedGEnglishGastrointestinalChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Small Intestine;StomachDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-11T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC)Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Learn what to do if your child's feeding tube becomes blocked.</p><p>If your child has a G or GJ tube, and it becomes blocked by formula or medications, it is important to try to unblock the tube as soon as possible. Leaving the tube blocked will delay or prevent food (i.e., formula), liquid, and medications from entering the stomach or jejunum (small intestine). The longer the tube remains blocked, the harder it may be to unblock.<br></p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If your child’s tube becomes blocked, it is important to try to unblock the tube right away.</li><li>If your child’s tube has an adaptor, remove it first to check if it is the cause of the blockage.</li><li>Use a pulsing push-and-pull motion with warm water to try to unblock your child’s feeding tube. If this does not work, contact your G tube specialist.</li><li>If you have a prescription for pancreatic enzymes and sodium bicarbonate, try this method if warm water does not work.</li><li>If your child has a low-profile G tube, first try to flush the tube via the feeding port before removing the tube and unblocking it manually. If this does not work, change the low-profile tube or insert a Foley catheter.</li><li>Prevent tube blockage by flushing with 5 to 10 mL water before and after you give food or medication, and every four hours during continuous feeds.<br></li></ul><h2>Preventing a blockage</h2><p>The best way to prevent a feeding tube from getting blocked with formula or medication is by keeping the inside of the feeding equipment and feeding tube as clean as possible.</p><ul><li>Flush the G tube or GJ tube with 5 to 10 mL of water before and after every feeding.</li><li>Flush the G tube or GJ tube before and after every dose of medication.</li><li>Flush the G tube or GJ tube every four hours during continuous feeds.</li><li>Clean the feeding bag and all extension tubing after each feeding and each dose of medication. You may use hot water and soap or a water and vinegar mixture to clean the tubing.</li><li>Dissolve all medications completely before administering them through the G tube or GJ tube.</li><li>Work with your pharmacy team to choose the best form of medications for use with a G tube or GJ tube.</li></ul><h2>How to unblock a feeding tube</h2><p>There are two different ways to unblock a feeding tube at home. Try using warm water first. If that doesn’t work, you can use activated pancreatic enzymes.<br></p><h3>Using warm water</h3><p>To unblock your child’s G tube or GJ tube, you will need a 1 mL and 5 mL slip-tip syringe and warm water.</p><ol><li>Fill the 1 mL and 5 mL slip-tip syringes with warm water.</li><li>If your child’s tube has an adaptor attached to the end of the tube, remove it.</li><li>Connect the 1 mL syringe directly to the feeding tube.</li><li>Using a pulsing push-and-pull motion, insert as much water into the tube as possible. This thrusting motion will help clear out any formula or medication that has built up inside the tube. You may have to try this a few times to unblock the tube.</li><li>When the tube is no longer blocked, flush with at least 5 mL of warm water.</li><li>If you removed the adaptor to attach the 1ml syringe directly to the tube, re-attach it to the tube to resume feeds and medication administrations.</li></ol><h3>Using activated pancreatic enzymes</h3><p>If you cannot unblock the feeding tube with warm water, you can try using pancrelipase (a combination of pancreatic enzymes) and sodium bicarbonate. This mixture works very well when the tube becomes blocked with formula. You will need a prescription from your physician or nurse practitioner to get the pancreatic enzymes from pharmacy. Your G tube specialist (at SickKids, this is the G Tube Resource Nurse) may provide you a prescription as well.</p><p>When using the pancreatic enzymes, please consider the following:</p><ol><li>Pancrelipase is made from pork products. Cultural and dietary considerations must be considered.</li><li>If your child has an allergy to pork products, do not attempt this.</li><li>There is a possibility of skin irritation and redness if the pancreatic enzymes are left on the skin. When opening the capsule, be careful not to spill the contents on the skin. If you do, simply wash the area with soap and water right away.</li></ol><p>To use the pancreatic enzymes, you will need one pancrelipase capsule, one sodium bicarbonate 325 mg tablet, sterile or distilled water, and two 5 mL syringes (one to mix the medications and one to flush).</p><p>This is what you can do:</p><ol><li>Wash your hands.</li><li>Open the pancreatic enzyme capsule.</li><li>Crush the sodium bicarbonate tablet.</li><li>Mix the two drugs together with 5 to 10 mL of warm sterile or distilled water.</li><li>Push as much of the mixture into the tube as possible; then let it sit in the tube for 30 minutes.</li><li>Attempt to flush the tube with at least 5 mL of sterile or distilled water.</li><ul><li>If your child is younger than 1 year, only try this procedure once.</li><li>If your child is older than 1 year, you can repeat the procedure twice. If you are unsuccessful in unblocking the tube, you may repeat this procedure immediately after the first attempt. Ensure you aspirate all the remaining pancreatic enzyme mixture in the tube prior to pushing the new mixture.</li></ul><li>If the tube has become unblocked, flush with at least 5 mL of sterile or distilled water and continue with your feeds and medications.</li></ol><p>If warm water or activated pancreatic enzymes do not unblock the feeding tube, and if your child has a G tube or GJ tube that cannot be replaced by you at home, contact your child’s G tube specialist to have your child’s tube replaced in hospital.</p><h2>If your child’s low-profile tube is blocked</h2><p>Low-profile balloon type G tubes, such as the Mic-Key button or AMT MiniONE, rarely block because they are much shorter than other types of G tubes. Ensure the extension tubing is not blocked by flushing it with 5 to 10 mL of warm sterile water. If the extension tubing is blocked, replace it with new extension tubing. If you have been trained to change your child’s low-profile balloon type G tube, you may replace the feeding tube with a new one.</p><ol><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Use a slip tip syringe to deflate the balloon of the tube. Throw this water away.</li><li>Remove the tube from the stoma.</li><li>You may see a physical blockage in the tube. Use your index finger and thumb to squeeze the tube at the site of the blockage. Flush the tube with at least 5 mL of water to attempt to remove the blockage.</li><li>If you are successful at unblocking the low-profile G tube, and the tube is not broken, wash the low-profile G tube with soap and water, lubricate the tip of the low-profile G tube and re-insert it into the stoma. Once inserted, inflate the balloon with the amount of sterile or distilled water you normally use.</li><li>You will then need to check that the tube is in the stomach. Do this by attaching the extension tubing to the tube and pull back with a syringe until you see stomach contents flow from the tube. Once you see stomach contents, flush the tube with 5 mL of water.</li><li>If you are unsuccessful at unblocking the low-profile tube, or the tube is broken, insert a new low-profile G tube or a Foley catheter. If you have inserted the Foley catheter, contact your G tube specialist to arrange for the low-profile tube to be replaced.</li></ol><h2>How do you know if a feeding tube is blocked?</h2><ul><li>If your child receives a feed continuously via the feeding pump, the feeding pump may beep, saying there is an occlusion or flow error. This may be a problem with the pump, the feeding bag, or the tube itself.</li><li>If your child receives feed via gravity using a feeding bag, you may notice the feed stops dripping in the dripping chamber of feeding bag system.</li><li>When you are flushing your child’s tube, it may feel hard to push and only a small amount of fluid will go into the tube. This is a called a “partial blockage.”</li><li>When you are flushing your child’s tube, you may not be able to get any fluid at all into the tube. This usually means the tube is completely blocked.</li></ul><p>If your child’s G or GJ tube has any adaptors at the end of their tube, remove them and flush with water to ensure patency of adaptor. If you remove the adaptor and stomach contents flow back from the tube, your tube is not truly blocked. Rather, the adaptor was blocked and it can be washed or replaced. However, if the G tube or GJ tube does not flow back after removing the adaptor, this means the tube is blocked.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><h3>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</h3><p>Phone 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager 416-377-1271</p><p>g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube is blockedFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.