G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube movesGG/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube movesG/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube movesEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Small Intestine;StomachDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-11T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC)Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to prevent your child's G tube from moving in and out of the stoma, and what to do if you suspect it has moved.</p><p>Gastrostomy tubes (G tubes) and gastrojujenostomy tubes (GJ tubes) are feeding devices. A G tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the stomach. A GJ tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the small intestine (the jejunum). Both G tubes and GJ tubes are placed in a surgical opening in your child's tummy (abdomen) called the stoma. The tunnel from the outside into the stomach is called the tract.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If your child’s G tube looks longer or shorter than normal, it may have moved out of position.</li><li>If you child has a G tube inserted by a radiologist using image guidance, it can be re-positioned to sit in the stomach.</li><li>If your child has a GJ tube that moved out of position, you will need to contact the G tube Resource Nurse immediately or visit the emergency department as the tube cannot be re-positioned at home . An image guidance will be required re-position the tube in jejunum.</li><li>Always secure the tube properly to prevent it moving in and out of the stoma.</li></ul><p>MacLoc™ G tubes and Corflo™ PEG tubes are types of feeding tubes placed by an interventional radiologist using image guidance. Low-profile balloon type G tubes are placed by a G tube specialist (at SickKids this is the G Tube Resource Nurse). If your child’s G tube looks longer or shorter than normal, it may have moved out of position. Depending on the type of G tube your child has, the instructions for moving the tube back into place may be different.</p><h2>MacLoc™ G tube</h2><p>If your child has a MacLoc™ type G tube that looks longer or shorter than normal, it may have moved out of position.</p><p>If the MacLoc™ type G tube has moved farther into the stomach, your child may experience the following signs and symptoms:</p><ul><li>Vomiting</li><li>Discomfort or pain</li><li>Diarrhea</li><li>Bloated stomach.</li></ul><p>If any of these signs occur, contact your G Tube team.</p><h3>Preventing your child’s MacLoc™ G tube from moving</h3><p>To prevent your child’s MacLoc™ type G tube from moving:</p><ul><li>Always secure the tube in place with tape</li><li>Mark the outside part of your child’s feeding tube where it meets the stoma.</li></ul><p>How to mark your child's MacLoc™ G tube:</p><ol><li>Wash your hands with soap and water</li><li>Remove the tape securing the tube to the skin</li><li>Pull back on the tube gently</li><li>When you feel resistance, stop pulling. Push the tube into the stomach 1-2 cm. </li><li>Re-tape the tube to the skin and mark the tube where it meets the stoma. Use a permanent marker so it will not wash off with your daily soap and water cleaning.</li></ol> <p>You may also measure the length of the outside part of the feeding tube, from stoma to adaptor. Make sure to mark this number down somewhere you will remember.</p><h2>Corflo™ PEG tube</h2><p>A Corflo™ PEG tube has a round bolster inside the stomach that helps prevent the tube from being pulled out. There is a crossbar or white elbow fixation device at the stoma that helps prevent the tube from moving into the stomach. If the crossbar or elbow fixation device is not sitting at your child’s stoma, the tube may have moved out of position.</p><p>If the Corflo™ PEG tube has moved farther into the stomach your child may experience the following signs and symptoms:</p><ul><li>Vomiting</li><li>Discomfort or pain</li><li>Diarrhea</li><li>Bloated stomach.</li></ul><p>If any of these signs occur, contact your G tube team.</p><h3>Preventing your child’s Corflo™ PEG tube from moving</h3><p>To prevent your child’s Corflo™ PEG tube from moving:</p><ul><li>Always secure the tube. </li><li>A crossbar or elbow fixation device is used to prevent the tube moving from in and out of the stoma.</li><li>Ensure proper fit of the crossbar or elbow fixation device at the stoma.</li></ul><p>For the first two weeks after tube insertion, do not adjust the crossbar or elbow fixation device. Contact your G tube team if you have concerns about the placement of the cross bar or elbow fixation device. </p><p>Two weeks after the initial insertion of the Corflo™ PEG tube, you may adjust the crossbar or elbow fixation device to sit at the stoma.</p><p>How to re-position your child’s Corflo™ PEG tube:</p><ol><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Remove any tape used to secure the tube to abdomen.</li><li>Pull the tube back gently until resistance felt. This means the bolster is at the end of stoma tract.</li><li>Stop pulling when resistance felt, then adjust the crossbar or elbow fixation device to sit at the stoma.</li><li>Re-tape the tube to the skin if preferred and secure the tube well.</li></ol><h2>Low-profile balloon type G tube</h2><p>If your child has a low-profile balloon type G tube, it will not move farther into the stomach. This is a skin level tube that extends through the stoma. There is a balloon filled with water at the end of the tube that is in the stomach. This balloon holds the tube in place. Check the amount of water in the balloon at least once a week; if there is less water in the balloon, the tube may be able to move slightly in the tract. Use sterile or distilled water to refill the balloon.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><h3>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</h3><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager 416-377-1271</p><p>g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>

 

 

G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube moves3041.00000000000G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube movesG/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube movesGEnglishGastrointestinal;OtherChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Abdomen;Small Intestine;StomachDigestive systemNon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-04-11T04:00:00ZTharini Paramananthan, RN, BScN, MScN;Silvana Oppedisano, MN, RN(EC)Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to prevent your child's G tube from moving in and out of the stoma, and what to do if you suspect it has moved.</p><p>Gastrostomy tubes (G tubes) and gastrojujenostomy tubes (GJ tubes) are feeding devices. A G tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the stomach. A GJ tube gives liquid nutrition, medication and other fluids directly into the small intestine (the jejunum). Both G tubes and GJ tubes are placed in a surgical opening in your child's tummy (abdomen) called the stoma. The tunnel from the outside into the stomach is called the tract.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>If your child’s G tube looks longer or shorter than normal, it may have moved out of position.</li><li>If you child has a G tube inserted by a radiologist using image guidance, it can be re-positioned to sit in the stomach.</li><li>If your child has a GJ tube that moved out of position, you will need to contact the G tube Resource Nurse immediately or visit the emergency department as the tube cannot be re-positioned at home . An image guidance will be required re-position the tube in jejunum.</li><li>Always secure the tube properly to prevent it moving in and out of the stoma.</li></ul><p>MacLoc™ G tubes and Corflo™ PEG tubes are types of feeding tubes placed by an interventional radiologist using image guidance. Low-profile balloon type G tubes are placed by a G tube specialist (at SickKids this is the G Tube Resource Nurse). If your child’s G tube looks longer or shorter than normal, it may have moved out of position. Depending on the type of G tube your child has, the instructions for moving the tube back into place may be different.</p><h2>MacLoc™ G tube</h2><p>If your child has a MacLoc™ type G tube that looks longer or shorter than normal, it may have moved out of position.</p><p>If the MacLoc™ type G tube has moved farther into the stomach, your child may experience the following signs and symptoms:</p><ul><li>Vomiting</li><li>Discomfort or pain</li><li>Diarrhea</li><li>Bloated stomach.</li></ul><p>If any of these signs occur, contact your G Tube team.</p><h3>Preventing your child’s MacLoc™ G tube from moving</h3><p>To prevent your child’s MacLoc™ type G tube from moving:</p><ul><li>Always secure the tube in place with tape</li><li>Mark the outside part of your child’s feeding tube where it meets the stoma.</li></ul><p>How to mark your child's MacLoc™ G tube:</p><ol><li>Wash your hands with soap and water</li><li>Remove the tape securing the tube to the skin</li><li>Pull back on the tube gently</li><li>When you feel resistance, stop pulling. Push the tube into the stomach 1-2 cm. </li><li>Re-tape the tube to the skin and mark the tube where it meets the stoma. Use a permanent marker so it will not wash off with your daily soap and water cleaning.</li></ol> <p>You may also measure the length of the outside part of the feeding tube, from stoma to adaptor. Make sure to mark this number down somewhere you will remember.</p><h2>Corflo™ PEG tube</h2><p>A Corflo™ PEG tube has a round bolster inside the stomach that helps prevent the tube from being pulled out. There is a crossbar or white elbow fixation device at the stoma that helps prevent the tube from moving into the stomach. If the crossbar or elbow fixation device is not sitting at your child’s stoma, the tube may have moved out of position.</p><p>If the Corflo™ PEG tube has moved farther into the stomach your child may experience the following signs and symptoms:</p><ul><li>Vomiting</li><li>Discomfort or pain</li><li>Diarrhea</li><li>Bloated stomach.</li></ul><p>If any of these signs occur, contact your G tube team.</p><h3>Preventing your child’s Corflo™ PEG tube from moving</h3><p>To prevent your child’s Corflo™ PEG tube from moving:</p><ul><li>Always secure the tube. </li><li>A crossbar or elbow fixation device is used to prevent the tube moving from in and out of the stoma.</li><li>Ensure proper fit of the crossbar or elbow fixation device at the stoma.</li></ul><p>For the first two weeks after tube insertion, do not adjust the crossbar or elbow fixation device. Contact your G tube team if you have concerns about the placement of the cross bar or elbow fixation device. </p><p>Two weeks after the initial insertion of the Corflo™ PEG tube, you may adjust the crossbar or elbow fixation device to sit at the stoma.</p><p>How to re-position your child’s Corflo™ PEG tube:</p><ol><li>Wash your hands with soap and water.</li><li>Remove any tape used to secure the tube to abdomen.</li><li>Pull the tube back gently until resistance felt. This means the bolster is at the end of stoma tract.</li><li>Stop pulling when resistance felt, then adjust the crossbar or elbow fixation device to sit at the stoma.</li><li>Re-tape the tube to the skin if preferred and secure the tube well.</li></ol><h2>Low-profile balloon type G tube</h2><p>If your child has a low-profile balloon type G tube, it will not move farther into the stomach. This is a skin level tube that extends through the stoma. There is a balloon filled with water at the end of the tube that is in the stomach. This balloon holds the tube in place. Check the amount of water in the balloon at least once a week; if there is less water in the balloon, the tube may be able to move slightly in the tract. Use sterile or distilled water to refill the balloon.</p><h2>At SickKids</h2><p>If your child is a SickKids patient, contact the G Tube Resource Nurse with any concerns.</p><h3>G Tube Resource Nurse contact info:</h3><p>Monday -Friday 8 am - 4 pm</p><p>Phone 416-813-7177</p><p>Pager 416-377-1271</p><p>g.tubenurse@sickkids.ca</p><p>On weekends/afterhours, you may need to come to the Emergency Department for an alternate method of feed/fluids/medication administration.</p>G/GJ tubes: What to do if your child’s feeding tube moves

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