Activity recommendations for your infant after heart surgeryAActivity recommendations for your infant after heart surgeryActivity recommendations for your infant after heart surgeryEnglishCardiologyBaby (1-12 months);Newborn (0-28 days);Toddler (13-24 months)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-05-22T04:00:00ZMaggie Harkness, MSc (OT);Ryan Ireland, MSc(PT);Sandy Spence, MSc(OT);Kate Turner, MSc(OT)Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>If your infant has heart surgery, there are specific activity recommendations you must follow. Learn how to help your infant recover after heart surgery.</p><p>After your infant has heart surgery, it is important that they avoid certain positions and activities, while still remaining active. This article outlines recommendations to follow in the days and months after heart surgery. It includes information on:</p><ul><li>Positioning and handling your child after surgery to promote recovery</li><li>Encouraging <a href="/Article?contentid=296&language=English">tummy time</a> with your baby</li><li>Activities to promote fine motor and thinking skills<br></li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>After heart surgery, there are certain positions that you should avoid with your baby until enough time has passed since their surgery.</li><li>To avoid the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), your baby should always sleep on their back.</li><li>To avoid positional plagiocephaly and promote healthy development, position your baby on their tummy, supported sitting or up in your arms throughout the day.</li><li>If you are concerned about your baby’s development, speak to your child’s family doctor or paediatrician.</li></ul>

 

 

Activity recommendations for your infant after heart surgery3209.00000000000Activity recommendations for your infant after heart surgeryActivity recommendations for your infant after heart surgeryAEnglishCardiologyBaby (1-12 months);Newborn (0-28 days);Toddler (13-24 months)NANANon-drug treatmentAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2018-05-22T04:00:00ZMaggie Harkness, MSc (OT);Ryan Ireland, MSc(PT);Sandy Spence, MSc(OT);Kate Turner, MSc(OT)Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>If your infant has heart surgery, there are specific activity recommendations you must follow. Learn how to help your infant recover after heart surgery.</p><p>After your infant has heart surgery, it is important that they avoid certain positions and activities, while still remaining active. This article outlines recommendations to follow in the days and months after heart surgery. It includes information on:</p><ul><li>Positioning and handling your child after surgery to promote recovery</li><li>Encouraging <a href="/Article?contentid=296&language=English">tummy time</a> with your baby</li><li>Activities to promote fine motor and thinking skills<br></li></ul><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>After heart surgery, there are certain positions that you should avoid with your baby until enough time has passed since their surgery.</li><li>To avoid the risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS), your baby should always sleep on their back.</li><li>To avoid positional plagiocephaly and promote healthy development, position your baby on their tummy, supported sitting or up in your arms throughout the day.</li><li>If you are concerned about your baby’s development, speak to your child’s family doctor or paediatrician.</li></ul><h2>Positioning and handling your child after surgery</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Time floowing sternal closure</th><th>Activity restrictions</th><th>Activity recommendations</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>First 2 weeks</td><td><ul><li>Avoid lying or playing on the tummy</li><li>Avoid lifting under arms</li><li>Avoid pulling arms when moving to sitting position or while dressing</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>Lift under head/neck and bottom</li><li>Encourage play in all other positions (lying on side, supported sitting, up in caregivers arms)</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td>2-6 weeks</td><td><ul><li>Avoid lifting under arms</li><li>Avoid pulling arms when moving to sitting position or while dressing</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>Lift under head/neck and bottom</li><li>Encourage play on tummy</li><li>Encourage play in all positions, as above</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td>More than 6 weeks</td><td><ul><li>No restrictions</li></ul></td><td><ul><li>Encourage all typical developmental activities</li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Sleep and tummy time</h2><p>To reduce the risk of <a href="/Article?contentid=460&language=English">sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS)</a> your baby should always sleep on their back. However, too much time on their back can lead to <a href="/Article?contentid=24&language=English">positional plagiocephaly (flattened head</a>). To prevent positional plagiocephaly and promote healthy development, you should position your baby on their tummy (if two weeks following sternal closure), supported sitting or up in your arms throughout the day.</p><h2>Tips to encourage tummy time with your baby</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Tip</th><th>Goal</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Start by placing your baby on their tummy for short periods of time, 3-5 times throughout the day</td><td>Your baby gradually becomes familiar with this position</td></tr><tr><td>Roll your baby from their back on to their tummy</td><td>Your baby will feel less startled than when placed directly on their tummy</td></tr><tr><td>Use a firm, flat surface such as a play mat or the floor</td><td>Promotes upper body strength and mobility</td></tr><tr><td>Encourage weight shifting and reaching by placing toys within view/reach </td><td>Improves strength needed for future sitting, rolling and crawling</td></tr><tr><td>When your baby is awake, lay them on your chest (“tummy-to-tummy”) while you lie down. This does not replace tummy time on a firm, flat surface</td><td>Your baby will learn to enjoy tummy time when they are comfortable and close to you</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Recommended activities to promote fine motor and thinking skills</h2><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Your baby's age</th><th>Suggested activities</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Birth to 3 months</td><td><ul><li>Toys that make noise or are brightly coloured will draw attention and encourage your baby to look and reach in the direction of the toy</li><li>Toys of different textures help your baby get used to how different things feel</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td>3 to 6 months</td><td><ul><li>Rattles and toys of different sizes and shapes will help your child learn how to grasp and hold objects</li><li>Toys that make interesting sounds (rattles, shakers, musical instruments) will encourage your baby to explore the connection between sound and movement</li><li>A play arch allows your baby to reach, kick and/or roll toward hanging toys</li></ul></td></tr><tr><td>6 to 12 months</td><td><ul><li>Toys that encourage imaginative thinking and building such as stacking and nesting toys, blocks and shape sorters, balls and cars</li><li>Toys that promote balance, pre-standing or standing such as ride-a-long and push-toys</li></ul></td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Monitoring your baby’s development</h2><p>If you are concerned with your baby’s development, speak to your child’s family doctor or paediatrician. If you are unsure whether or not your baby’s development is progressing appropriately, the Nipissing District Developmental Screen (NDDS) is a developmental checklist for infants and children up to six years of age that can be completed by a parent or health/childcare professional. You can locate a free copy of this developmental checklist at <a href="http://www.ndds.ca/ontario">http://www.ndds.ca/ontario.</a></p><p>If you or your baby’s doctors have a concern about your baby’s development, your baby may benefit from an assessment by an occupational therapist or physiotherapist. Your family doctor or paediatrician can make the appropriate referral to a therapist.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/Activity_recommendations_for_your_infant_after_heart_surgery.jpgActivity recommendations for your infant after heart surgeryFalse

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