Celiac disease: The gluten-free dietCCeliac disease: The gluten-free dietCeliac disease: The gluten-free dietEnglishGastrointestinalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Small IntestineSmall intestineNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-02-06T05:00:00ZPeggy Marcon, MD, FRCPC;Inez Martincevic, MSc, RD;Catharine Walsh, MD, MEd, PhD, FAAP, FRCPC8.0000000000000059.00000000000001364.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Children with celiac disease must follow a strict gluten-free diet. Learn what foods are and are not allowed on a gluten-free diet.</p><h2>What is celiac disease?</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=816&language=English">Celiac disease</a> is an autoimmune condition in which contact with gluten (a family of food proteins) triggers a reaction by the body’s defense (immune) system. The immune response to gluten—no matter where in the body the contact happened—damages the lining of the gut (small intestine) making it difficult to absorb nutrients.</p><p>Common symptoms of celiac disease include diarrhea, constipation, headaches, tiredness and anemia. Some people experience no symptoms at all.</p><p>Celiac disease is a life-long condition. There is no medication for celiac disease. The only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet for life. The gluten-free diet will help heal the gut, improve symptoms that may have been present, and keep your child healthy.</p> <figure class="asset-small"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/gluten_free_symbol_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition in which any contact with gluten (a family of food proteins) triggers a reaction from the body’s defense (immune) system.</li> <li>Gluten is found in rye, barley, triticale and all forms of wheat.</li> <li>The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet for life. The gluten-free diet will help heal the gut, improve symptoms that may have been present and keep your child healthy.</li> <li>Always read labels for sources of gluten.</li> <li>Choose products that are naturally gluten-free more often.</li> </ul><h2>Starting the gluten-free diet</h2><p>A strict gluten-free diet means no trace amounts of gluten. Gluten is naturally found in all forms of:</p><ul><li>wheat</li><li>rye</li><li>barley</li><li>triticale (rye and barley mix)</li></ul><p>Obvious sources of gluten are wheat-based products, such as breads, pasta and baked goods. However, there are also many foods where gluten is hidden, such as soups, salad dressings and ice creams.</p><h3>Learning to read labels</h3><p>Always read labels.</p><p>Read the labels of all foods and non-food items (such as medications and vitamins) to find out if they contain any sources of gluten.</p><p>Though you have been buying the same product for a long time, the ingredients may change without warning. This is why you should read the label of every product every time you shop.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Example of a food label with gluten-containing ingredients</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_food_label_gluten_ingredients_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">If you have celiac disease be sure to always read the ingredient list in full to spot any sources of gluten.</figcaption> </figure> <p>In Canada, if a product is labeled “gluten-free” then it is safe on a strict gluten-free diet. However, food companies in Canada are not required to label a food as gluten-free if it contains no gluten. So some products may be gluten-free even if not clearly labeled “gluten-free” on the package. An example is sugar.</p><p>Every pre-packaged food has an ingredient list on the label. Non-food items have a list that reads “non-medicinal ingredients, “contains” or something similar either on the package or on paper inside the package to read.</p><p>Your child <strong>cannot</strong> eat a food or use a non-food product if the label says:</p><ul><li>“May contain wheat, barley, rye or triticale.”</li><li>“Is made in a facility that also processes wheat, barley, rye or triticale.”</li></ul><p>The only way to make sure a product is gluten-free is if the product is processed in a factory that operates in a gluten-free environment. You can call the company to find out more about gluten exposure of products.</p><p>The table below lists:</p><ul><li>Ingredients that are gluten-free (allowed) and acceptable on a gluten-free diet.</li><li>Ingredients that may contain gluten (question). Some foods may contain, be made of, or include, a gluten ingredient such as dextrin. Dextrin can be made from corn (gluten-free) or wheat (not gluten-free). </li><li>Ingredients that contain gluten are not allowed on a strict gluten-free diet.</li></ul><p>This list does not include all the possible ingredients in Canada. </p><p>If you do not know whether a food is safe, do not eat it until you have contacted the company for more <a href="/Article?contentid=957&language=English">information</a>.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Allowed</th><th>Question</th><th>Not allowed</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>The following ingredients are naturally gluten-free</td><td>The following ingredients may contain gluten</td><td>The following ingredients contain gluten and must be taken out of your child's diet</td></tr><tr><td><p>Amaranth</p><p>Arrowroot flour</p><p>Baking soda</p><p>Buckwheat</p><p>Cassava (Manioc flour)</p><p>Chia/ Salba</p><p>Corn flour/ Cornstarch</p><p>Dal or Dahl </p><p>Flavors (artificial & natural) </p><p>Flax</p><p>Gelatin</p><p>Legumes (i.e. lentils, chickpeas)</p><p>Maltitol</p><p>Maltose</p><p>Mannitol</p><p>Millet</p><p>Molasses</p><p>Potato flour and starch</p><p>Quinoa</p><p>Rice </p><p>Sorghum</p><p>Soy</p><p>Spices</p><p>Tapioca flour and starch</p><p>Teff</p><p>Vegetable gums</p><p>Yeast (baking)</p></td><td><p>Dextrin</p><p>Hydrolyzed plant protein (HPP)</p><p>Hydrolyzed vegetable protein</p><p>Modified food starch</p><p>Seasonings</p><p>Starch</p></td><td>Barley <p></p><p>Beer</p><p>Bran</p><p>Bulgar</p><p>Couscous</p><p>Durum</p><p>Edible Starch</p><p>Einkhorn</p><p>Farina</p><p>Farro</p><p>Flour</p><p>Graham Flour</p><p>Kamut </p><p>Malt</p><p>Oats (exceptions apply; see below)</p><p>Rye</p><p>Semolina</p><p>Spelt (Dinkel)</p><p>Triticale</p><p>Wheat (i.e. bran, germ, starch)</p><p>Yeast (brewer’s)</p></td></tr></tbody></table><h3>Can my child eat oats?</h3><p>Oats are naturally gluten-free. </p><p>During processing, oats can become <a href="/Article?contentid=957&language=English">contaminated</a> with trace amounts of gluten (gluten from one food is passed on to oats) and are no longer gluten-free.</p><p>Gluten-free oats are available in Canada. However, your child should wait about one year after being strictly gluten-free before introducing gluten-free oats into their diet. Do not introduce gluten-free oats into your child’s diet until your doctor or dietitian tells you that it is safe to do so.</p><p>Once gluten-free oats are in your child’s diet, the Canadian Celiac Association recommends limiting the amount eaten to:</p><ul><li>20-25 grams per day (1/4 cup dry rolled oats) for children</li><li>50-70 grams per day (1/2-3/4 cup dry rolled oats) for adults.</li></ul><p>When in doubt, ask your doctor or dietitian about gluten-free oats for celiac disease.</p>
Maladie cœliaque : régime alimentaire sans glutenMMaladie cœliaque : régime alimentaire sans glutenCeliac disease: The gluten-free dietFrenchGastrointestinalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Small IntestineSmall intestineNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-02-06T05:00:00ZPeggy Marcon, MD, FRCPC;Inez Martincevic, MSc, RD;Catharine Walsh, MD, MEd, PhD, FAAP, FRCPC8.0000000000000059.00000000000001364.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Découvrez les aliments permis et interdits dans un régime sans gluten.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce que la maladie cœliaque?</h2> <p>La <a href="/Article?contentid=816&language=French">maladie cœliaque</a> est une maladie auto-immune dans laquelle tout contact avec le gluten, un groupe de protéines alimentaires, déclenche une réaction du système immunitaire, le système de défense de l’organisme. Cette réponse immunitaire au gluten, peu importe où le contact se produit dans le corps, endommage les parois internes de l’intestin grêle. L’absorption des nutriments devient alors plus difficile.</p> <p>Les symptômes courants de la maladie cœliaque sont la diarrhée, la constipation, les maux de tête, la fatigue et l’anémie. Certaines personnes ne présentent aucun symptôme.</p> <p>La maladie cœliaque est un trouble chronique (à vie). Il n’existe pas de médicament permettant de soigner la maladie cœliaque. Le seul traitement est un régime alimentaire strictement sans gluten à vie. Un tel régime facilitera la guérison de l’intestin, diminuera les symptômes existants, le cas échéant, et maintiendra votre enfant en bonne santé.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>La maladie cœliaque est une maladie auto-immune dans laquelle tout contact avec le gluten, un groupe de protéines alimentaires, déclenche une réaction du système immunitaire, le système de défense de l’organisme.</li> <li>On trouve du gluten dans le seigle, l’orge, le triticale et toutes les formes de blé.</li> <li>Le seul traitement de la maladie cœliaque est un régime alimentaire strictement sans gluten à vie. Un tel régime facilitera la guérison de l’intestin, diminuera les symptômes existants, le cas échéant, et maintiendra votre enfant en bonne santé.</li> <li>Lisez toujours les étiquettes pour connaître les sources de gluten.</li> <li>Favorisez les produits qui sont naturellement sans gluten.</li></ul><h2>Début du régime sans gluten</h2> <p>Un régime strictement sans gluten signifie une alimentation sans traces de gluten. Le gluten est présent naturellement dans toutes les formes d’aliments suivantes :</p> <ul><li>blé;</li> <li>seigle;</li> <li>orge;</li> <li>triticale (hybridation entre le blé et le seigle).</li></ul> <p>Les sources de gluten évidentes sont les produits à base de blé comme le pain, les pâtes et les produits de boulangerie. Il existe aussi de nombreux aliments dont le gluten est dissimulé comme les soupes, les sauces pour salade et la crème glacée.</p> <h3>Apprendre à lire les étiquettes</h3> <p>Consultez toujours l’étiquette des aliments et des produits non alimentaires comme les médicaments et les vitamines afin de voir s’ils contiennent des sources de gluten.</p> <p>Si vous achetez le même produit depuis longtemps, les ingrédients pourraient avoir changé sans avertissement. Vous devez donc lire l’étiquette des produits chaque fois que vous faites vos achats.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Example of a food label with gluten-containing ingredients <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_food_label_gluten_ingredients_FR.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">If you have celiac disease be sure to always read the ingredient list in full to spot any sources of gluten.</figcaption> </span></figure> <p>Au Canada, si un produit porte l’appellation « sans gluten », il est sans danger pour un régime strictement sans gluten. Cependant, les entreprises alimentaires canadiennes ne sont pas tenues d’étiqueter un aliment comme étant sans gluten s’il n’en contient pas. Ainsi, certains produits peuvent être sans gluten même s’ils ne portent pas clairement l’appellation « sans gluten » sur l’emballage. Le sucre en est un bon exemple.</p> <p>Tous les aliments préemballés affichent une étiquette de la valeur nutritionnelle des ingrédients. Quant aux produits non alimentaires, ils affichent une liste des « ingrédients non médicinaux » ou encore la mention « contient » ou un terme similaire sur l’emballage ou à l’intérieur du produit.</p> <p>Votre enfant ne doit pas consommer un aliment ni utiliser un produit non alimentaire si l’étiquette indique :</p> <ul><li>« Peut contenir du blé, de l’orge, du seigle et du triticale. »</li> <li>« Produit fait dans une installation où on trouve aussi du blé, de l’orge, du seigle et du triticale. »</li></ul> <p>La seule façon de s’assurer qu’un produit est sans gluten est de vérifier s’il est transformé dans une usine sans gluten. Vous pouvez appeler l’entreprise pour vous renseigner sur l’exposition des produits au gluten.</p> <p>Le tableau ci-dessous présente :</p> <ul><li>Les ingrédients sans gluten acceptables dans un régime sans gluten (permis).</li> <li>Les ingrédients qui peuvent contenir du gluten (douteux). Certains aliments peuvent contenir un ingrédient non exempt de gluten ou être fabriqués à partir d’un tel ingrédient comme la dextrine. La dextrine peut être fabriquée à partir de maïs, elle est alors sans gluten, ou à partir de blé, elle contient alors du gluten.</li> <li>Les ingrédients contenant du gluten sont interdits dans un régime strictement sans gluten.</li></ul> <p>La liste qui suit ne comprend pas nécessairement tous les ingrédients que l’on peut trouver au Canada.</p> <p>Si vous ignorez si un aliment est sans danger pour vous, ne le consommez pas avant d’avoir communiqué avec l’entreprise pour obtenir <a href="/Article?contentid=957&language=French">plus de renseignements</a>.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <thead> <tr><th>Permis</th><th>Douteux</th><th>Interdits</th></tr> </thead> <tbody> <tr> <td>Les ingrédients suivants sont naturellement sans gluten.</td> <td>Les ingrédients suivants peuvent contenir du gluten.</td> <td>Les aliments suivants contiennent du gluten et doivent être exclus du régime alimentaire de votre enfant.</td> </tr> <tr> <td><p>Amarante</p><p>Marante</p><p>Bicarbonate de soude</p><p>Sarrasin commun</p><p>Manioc (farine de manioc)</p><p>Chia/salba</p><p>Farine de maïs/fécule de maïs</p><p>Dal (ou dahl) </p><p>Saveurs (artificielles et naturelles) </p><p>Lin/p></p><p>Gélatine</p><p>Légumineuses (p. ex., lentilles, pois chiches)</p><p>Maltitol</p><p>Maltose</p><p>Mannitol</p><p>Millet</p><p>Mélasse</p><p>Farine et fécule de pomme de terre</p><p>Quinoa</p><p>Riz </p><p>Sorgho</p><p>Soja</p><p>Spices</p><p>Épices</p><p>Farine de tapioca et fécule de manioc</p><p>Tef</p><p>Gommes végétales</p><p>Levure (à cuisson)</p></td> <td><p>Dextrine</p><p>Protéine végétale hydrolysée</p><p>Amidon modifié d'usage alimentaire</p><p>Assaisonnements</p><p>Amidon</p></td> <td>Orge<p></p><p>Bière</p><p>Son</p><p>Bulgur</p><p>Couscous</p><p>Blé dur</p><p>Amidon comestible</p><p>Petit épeautre</p> <p>Farina</p> <p>Farro</p> <p>Farine</p> <p>Farine de blé entier</p> <p>Kamut </p> <p>Malt</p> <p>Avoine (des exceptions s'appliquent; voir cidessous)</p> <p>Seigle</p> <p>Semoule</p> <p>Épeautre</p> <p>Triticale </p> <p>Blé (son, germe, amidon)</p> <p>Levure (à bière)</p></td></tr></tbody></table> <h3>Mon enfant peut-il consommer de l’avoine?</h3> <p>L’avoine est naturellement sans gluten.</p> <p>Toutefois, pendant le traitement d’un aliment, l’avoine peut être <a href="/Article?contentid=957&language=French">contaminée</a> par des traces de gluten. Elle n’est alors plus exempte de gluten.</p> <p>On peut trouver de l’avoine sans gluten au Canada. Votre enfant devra cependant attendre environ un an après le suivi d’un régime strictement sans gluten pour intégrer l’avoine sans gluten dans son alimentation. N’intégrez pas d’avoine sans gluten dans le régime de votre enfant jusqu’à ce que votre médecin ou un diététicien vous confirme que cette céréale est sans danger.</p> <p>Une fois l’avoine sans gluten intégrée dans le régime alimentaire de votre enfant, l’Association canadienne de la maladie cœliaque recommande d’en limiter la consommation comme suit :</p> <ul><li>de 20 à 25 gr par jour (1/4 de tasse de flocons d’avoine secs) pour les enfants;</li> <li>de 50 à 70 gr par jour (1/2 - 3/4 tasse de flocons d’avoine secs) pour les adultes.</li></ul> <p>En cas de doute, renseignez-vous auprès de votre médecin ou diététicien sur l’avoine sans gluten pour les personnes atteintes de la maladie cœliaque.</p>

 

 

Celiac disease: The gluten-free diet956.000000000000Celiac disease: The gluten-free dietCeliac disease: The gluten-free dietCEnglishGastrointestinalBaby (1-12 months);Toddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Small IntestineSmall intestineNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2017-02-06T05:00:00ZPeggy Marcon, MD, FRCPC;Inez Martincevic, MSc, RD;Catharine Walsh, MD, MEd, PhD, FAAP, FRCPC8.0000000000000059.00000000000001364.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Children with celiac disease must follow a strict gluten-free diet. Learn what foods are and are not allowed on a gluten-free diet.</p><h2>What is celiac disease?</h2><p> <a href="/Article?contentid=816&language=English">Celiac disease</a> is an autoimmune condition in which contact with gluten (a family of food proteins) triggers a reaction by the body’s defense (immune) system. The immune response to gluten—no matter where in the body the contact happened—damages the lining of the gut (small intestine) making it difficult to absorb nutrients.</p><p>Common symptoms of celiac disease include diarrhea, constipation, headaches, tiredness and anemia. Some people experience no symptoms at all.</p><p>Celiac disease is a life-long condition. There is no medication for celiac disease. The only treatment is a strict gluten-free diet for life. The gluten-free diet will help heal the gut, improve symptoms that may have been present, and keep your child healthy.</p> <figure class="asset-small"> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/gluten_free_symbol_EN.jpg" alt="" /> </figure> <br><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Celiac disease is an autoimmune condition in which any contact with gluten (a family of food proteins) triggers a reaction from the body’s defense (immune) system.</li> <li>Gluten is found in rye, barley, triticale and all forms of wheat.</li> <li>The only treatment for celiac disease is a strict gluten-free diet for life. The gluten-free diet will help heal the gut, improve symptoms that may have been present and keep your child healthy.</li> <li>Always read labels for sources of gluten.</li> <li>Choose products that are naturally gluten-free more often.</li> </ul><h2>Maintaining good nutrition while on a gluten-free diet</h2> <p>Compared to gluten-containing foods, most commercially available gluten-free foods are:</p> <ul> <li>higher in sugar and carbohydrates (very important if you have <a href="/Article?contentid=1719&language=English">type 1 diabetes</a>)</li> <li>higher in fat </li> <li>higher in calories </li> <li>lower in fiber</li> <li>less fortified</li> </ul> <p>To improve the nutrition of a gluten-free diet, eat:</p> <ul> <li>more fruits and vegetables</li> <li>whole grain gluten-free grains like amaranth, brown rice, buckwheat (kasha), flax and other seeds, millet, quinoa, wild rice</li> <li>enriched gluten-free grains (most often enriched with <a href="/Article?contentid=1453&language=English">B vitamins</a>)</li> </ul> <h3>Vitamins and minerals</h3> <p>Packaged gluten-free foods are often not fortified like gluten-containing grains. Speak to your dietitian or other health-care provider about the need to supplement vitamins and minerals, such as <a href="/Article?contentid=1449&language=English">folate</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a>.</p> <p><a href="/Article?contentid=1447&language=English">Vitamin D</a> contributes to bone and immune health. People with autoimmune diseases need to take vitamin D as a supplement. </p> <p>Children with celiac disease need the following amounts of vitamin D: </p> <ul> <li>Children younger than six years: 400-600 IU vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) every day</li> <li>Children older than six years: 800-1000 IU vitamin D3 (cholecalciferol) every day.</li> </ul><h2>Starting the gluten-free diet</h2><p>A strict gluten-free diet means no trace amounts of gluten. Gluten is naturally found in all forms of:</p><ul><li>wheat</li><li>rye</li><li>barley</li><li>triticale (rye and barley mix)</li></ul><p>Obvious sources of gluten are wheat-based products, such as breads, pasta and baked goods. However, there are also many foods where gluten is hidden, such as soups, salad dressings and ice creams.</p><h3>Learning to read labels</h3><p>Always read labels.</p><p>Read the labels of all foods and non-food items (such as medications and vitamins) to find out if they contain any sources of gluten.</p><p>Though you have been buying the same product for a long time, the ingredients may change without warning. This is why you should read the label of every product every time you shop.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Example of a food label with gluten-containing ingredients</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_food_label_gluten_ingredients_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">If you have celiac disease be sure to always read the ingredient list in full to spot any sources of gluten.</figcaption> </figure> <p>In Canada, if a product is labeled “gluten-free” then it is safe on a strict gluten-free diet. However, food companies in Canada are not required to label a food as gluten-free if it contains no gluten. So some products may be gluten-free even if not clearly labeled “gluten-free” on the package. An example is sugar.</p><p>Every pre-packaged food has an ingredient list on the label. Non-food items have a list that reads “non-medicinal ingredients, “contains” or something similar either on the package or on paper inside the package to read.</p><p>Your child <strong>cannot</strong> eat a food or use a non-food product if the label says:</p><ul><li>“May contain wheat, barley, rye or triticale.”</li><li>“Is made in a facility that also processes wheat, barley, rye or triticale.”</li></ul><p>The only way to make sure a product is gluten-free is if the product is processed in a factory that operates in a gluten-free environment. You can call the company to find out more about gluten exposure of products.</p><p>The table below lists:</p><ul><li>Ingredients that are gluten-free (allowed) and acceptable on a gluten-free diet.</li><li>Ingredients that may contain gluten (question). Some foods may contain, be made of, or include, a gluten ingredient such as dextrin. Dextrin can be made from corn (gluten-free) or wheat (not gluten-free). </li><li>Ingredients that contain gluten are not allowed on a strict gluten-free diet.</li></ul><p>This list does not include all the possible ingredients in Canada. </p><p>If you do not know whether a food is safe, do not eat it until you have contacted the company for more <a href="/Article?contentid=957&language=English">information</a>.</p><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Allowed</th><th>Question</th><th>Not allowed</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>The following ingredients are naturally gluten-free</td><td>The following ingredients may contain gluten</td><td>The following ingredients contain gluten and must be taken out of your child's diet</td></tr><tr><td><p>Amaranth</p><p>Arrowroot flour</p><p>Baking soda</p><p>Buckwheat</p><p>Cassava (Manioc flour)</p><p>Chia/ Salba</p><p>Corn flour/ Cornstarch</p><p>Dal or Dahl </p><p>Flavors (artificial & natural) </p><p>Flax</p><p>Gelatin</p><p>Legumes (i.e. lentils, chickpeas)</p><p>Maltitol</p><p>Maltose</p><p>Mannitol</p><p>Millet</p><p>Molasses</p><p>Potato flour and starch</p><p>Quinoa</p><p>Rice </p><p>Sorghum</p><p>Soy</p><p>Spices</p><p>Tapioca flour and starch</p><p>Teff</p><p>Vegetable gums</p><p>Yeast (baking)</p></td><td><p>Dextrin</p><p>Hydrolyzed plant protein (HPP)</p><p>Hydrolyzed vegetable protein</p><p>Modified food starch</p><p>Seasonings</p><p>Starch</p></td><td>Barley <p></p><p>Beer</p><p>Bran</p><p>Bulgar</p><p>Couscous</p><p>Durum</p><p>Edible Starch</p><p>Einkhorn</p><p>Farina</p><p>Farro</p><p>Flour</p><p>Graham Flour</p><p>Kamut </p><p>Malt</p><p>Oats (exceptions apply; see below)</p><p>Rye</p><p>Semolina</p><p>Spelt (Dinkel)</p><p>Triticale</p><p>Wheat (i.e. bran, germ, starch)</p><p>Yeast (brewer’s)</p></td></tr></tbody></table><h3>Can my child eat oats?</h3><p>Oats are naturally gluten-free. </p><p>During processing, oats can become <a href="/Article?contentid=957&language=English">contaminated</a> with trace amounts of gluten (gluten from one food is passed on to oats) and are no longer gluten-free.</p><p>Gluten-free oats are available in Canada. However, your child should wait about one year after being strictly gluten-free before introducing gluten-free oats into their diet. Do not introduce gluten-free oats into your child’s diet until your doctor or dietitian tells you that it is safe to do so.</p><p>Once gluten-free oats are in your child’s diet, the Canadian Celiac Association recommends limiting the amount eaten to:</p><ul><li>20-25 grams per day (1/4 cup dry rolled oats) for children</li><li>50-70 grams per day (1/2-3/4 cup dry rolled oats) for adults.</li></ul><p>When in doubt, ask your doctor or dietitian about gluten-free oats for celiac disease.</p><h2>Gluten-free shopping</h2><h3>Food products<br></h3> <a href="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/PDF_gluten_free_diet_tables_EN.pdf"> <figure> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/IMD_gluten_free_diet_PDFdownload_EN.jpg" alt="Download a poster to help you shop safely and easily for gluten-free foods" /> </figure> </a> <p>Gluten is present in many foods. To help you shop safely and easily, you can download the tables from this page. They list foods that contain no gluten (allowed), those to question because they may contain gluten (question), and foods to exclude from your strict gluten-free diet (not allowed). They are organized as follow:</p><ul><li>grain products</li><li>meats and alternatives</li><li>milk and alternatives</li><li>vegetables and fruit</li><li>fats and oils</li><li>snack foods</li><li>desserts and sweets</li><li>other foods</li></ul><h3>Non-food sources of gluten</h3><p>Check that these products contain no gluten:</p><ul><li>medications (both prescribed and over the counter); inform your pharmacist about the diagnosis of celiac disease</li><li>vitamins, minerals or other supplements</li><li>products where the label is on the box or bag that the product comes in (for example, a vitamin bottle that comes in a box or Halloween treats where several servings come packaged in a large bag)</li></ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Example of a drug label with gluten-containing ingredients</span> <img alt="Example of a drug label with gluten-containing ingredients" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/drug_label_gluten_ingredients_EN.jpg" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Always read the entire drug label and make sure to pay close attention to the <em>active ingredients</em>, <em>warning</em> and <em>inactive ingredients</em> sections. These sections of the label will indicate any gluten-containing ingredient found in the drug. If you are unsure you should read the product monograph and/or speak with a pharmacist.</figcaption> </figure> <p>Some items that are not meant to be eaten may contain gluten and can trigger a reaction by the immune system. Examples of commonly used products to remove as part of treating celiac disease include gluten-containing:</p><ul><li>hand creams</li><li>lipstick, lip gloss and lip balm</li><li>cosmetics (for example, shampoo, toothpaste, soap)</li><li>play dough</li></ul><h3>At the grocery store</h3><p>When grocery shopping, select naturally gluten-free foods, such as fruits and vegetables, plain meat and alternatives and minimally processed dairy. Focus your shopping on the outer areas of the grocery store and less from shelves where you can find many pre-packaged and processed foods.</p><p>Some packaged foods are naturally gluten-free (for example plain rice) but will not have a “gluten-free” label so be sure to read the ingredient list of all products to check for sources of gluten.</p><p>Look in the health food section of grocery stores to find gluten-free products.</p><p>Do not buy foods from bulk bins as they may contain gluten because of <a href="/Article?contentid=957&language=English">cross-contamination</a>.</p>glutenfreediethttps://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/gluten_free_symbol_EN.jpgCeliac disease: The gluten-free diet

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