AboutKidsHealth

 

 

Wheat allergyWWheat allergyWheat allergyEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-03-08T05:00:00Z8.9000000000000059.20000000000001061.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child manage a wheat allergy.</p><h2>What is a wheat allergy?</h2><p>A wheat allergy occurs when the body reacts to one or more of the proteins found in wheat.</p><p>A wheat allergy is very different from a condition known as <a href="/Article?contentid=816&language=English">celiac disease</a>. With celiac disease, a person cannot tolerate gluten, a different protein found in wheat and other grains.</p><h2>How serious is a wheat allergy?</h2><p>Wheat allergy reactions are different for each child, but they usually happen soon after your child consumes wheat. Inhaling wheat flour can also trigger a reaction in some children.</p><p>A wheat allergy carries the risk of <a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=English">anaphylaxis</a>, a severe and life-threatening allergic reaction.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A child with a wheat allergy will usually outgrow it as they get older. The protein responsible for a wheat allergy is different from that responsible for a gluten intolerance. </li><li>Other names for wheat include bulgur, farina, spelt, couscous, semolina and graham flour. Food products that contain wheat include baked goods, canned soups, salad dressings, cereals, pastas, seasonings and soy sauce.</li><li>Your child can get the nutrients in wheat from other foods such as vegetables, fruit, rice, peas, beans, milk, cheese and meat. Safe wheat-free grain alternatives include quinoa, millet, oats, barley and corn. </li><li>To prevent an allergic reaction, always read food product labels, avoid foods if you are not sure of the ingredients and avoid using utensils or containers that might have come in contact with wheat.</li><li>If your child's diet is limited because of a wheat allergy, a registered dietitian can offer advice on getting a balanced diet.</li></ul><h2>Possible sources of wheat</h2> <p>Wheat is used in a range of packaged foods. Below is a list of some of the many food products that contain wheat.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Baked goods and baking mixes (cakes, cookies, donuts, muffins)</td> <td>Baking powder, flour, icing sugar</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Battered or fried foods</td> <td>Bread, cereals, crackers, pastas</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Canned soups (“thickened” soups)</td> <td>​Coffee substitutes</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Gelatinized or modified starch</td> <td>Ice cream</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Meat, fish and poultry binders and fillers (found mainly in deli meats and hot dogs)</td> <td>Natural flavouring (from malt or wheat)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Pie fillings</td> <td>Prepared ketchup, mustard</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Salad dressings, sauces, gravy</td> <td>Seasonings, spices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Snack foods (candy, chocolate bars)</td> <td>Soy sauce</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>What do I do if my child has a wheat allergy?</h2><p>Your child should see an allergist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies) who can discuss the wheat allergy with you in more detail. Children who have a wheat allergy should avoid all products that may contain wheat.</p><p>Your child’s doctor may also prescribe a medication called an <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=130&language=English">epinephrine auto-injector</a>, which can be used to treat allergic reactions, in case your child accidentally eats a food containing wheat.</p><h2>Reducing the risk of cross-contamination</h2><p>Cross-contamination occurs when one substance unintentionally comes in contact with another substance, for example a potential allergen. If the substances mix together, one substance taints the other substance, making it unsafe to eat.</p><p>Food allergens can contaminate other foods when, for example, the same containers, utensils or frying pans hold a range of foods.</p><p>Bulk food containers pose a high risk of cross-contamination because they are often used for different products.</p><p>Be sure to avoid using utensils or containers that may have come in contact with allergy-causing foods and ask about possible cross-contamination when eating out.</p><h2>How can my child get the right mix of nutrients if they must avoid wheat?</h2><p>The main nutrients in wheat include fibre, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1444&language=English">protein</a>, B vitamins, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1449&language=English">folate</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1451&language=English">magnesium</a> and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1452&language=English">zinc</a>. Your child can still get these nutrients even if they must avoid wheat.</p><h3>Nutrients in wheat that are found in other foods</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Nutrient</th><th>Where to find it</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Fibre</td><td>Vegetables, fruit</td></tr><tr><td>Protein</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese, milk, beans, soy</td></tr><tr><td>B vitamins</td><td>Rice, milk, cheese, beef</td></tr><tr><td>Folate</td><td>Leafy green vegetables, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), lentils</td></tr><tr><td>Iron</td><td>Spinach, tomato puree, edamame (soy beans), lima beans, snow peas, instant oatmeal, cereal</td></tr><tr><td>Magnesium</td><td>Peas, pumpkin, squash or sesame seeds</td></tr><tr><td>Zinc</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, vegetables</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Wheat-free bread and cereal alternatives</h2><p>A wheat allergy does not mean that your child must avoid all cereals, breads, pastas or baked goods. Safe, wheat-free alternatives include products made from rice, corn, potato, sorghum, oats, barley, amaranth, buckwheat, tapioca, millet, arrowroot, soy, lentils, peas, beans and quinoa. Foods labelled “gluten free” are also safe to eat since all gluten-free foods are also free of wheat. Always read the nutrition label to make sure ingredients have not changed.</p><h2>When to go to the emergency room</h2><p>If your child is having a severe allergic reaction to wheat, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency department immediately. If your child’s doctor prescribed them an epinephrine autoinjector, administer this medication to your child right away. See <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=781&language=English">Anaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reaction</a> for more information.</p><h2>​Further information</h2><p>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/wheat-priority-food-allergen.html" target="_blank">Wheat & Triticale - Priority food allergens</a></p>
Allergie au bléAAllergie au bléWheat allergyFrenchAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+) CaregiversNA2014-12-18T05:00:00ZHealth (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Comment aider votre enfant à gérer son allergie au blé.</p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une allergie au blé?</h2><p>Une allergie au blé se produit quand le corps réagit à l’une ou plusieurs des protéines contenues dans le blé.</p><p>L’allergie au blé est très différente de la maladie cœliaque. Dans le cas de la maladie cœliaque, une personne ne peut tolérer le gluten, une protéine différente contenue dans le blé et dans d’autres grains.</p><h2>Mon enfant sera-t-il toujours atteint d’une allergie au blé?</h2><p>Chez plusieurs enfants atteints, l’allergie au blé disparaît avant l’âge scolaire. Un allergologue (un médecin qui se spécialise dans le diagnostic et le traitement des allergies) peut vous aider à déterminer le bon moment de tester votre enfant afin de déterminer si son allergie a disparu.</p><h2>À retenir</h2><ul><li>L’allergie au blé disparaît généralement avant l’âge scolaire chez la plupart des enfants. La protéine responsable de l’allergie au blé est différente de cette responsable de l’intolérance au gluten.</li><li>On peut retrouver le blé sous d’autres noms, dont le boulgour, la farina, l’épeautre, le couscous, la semoule de blé tendre et la farine Graham. Les produits alimentaires contenant du blé comprennent les produits de boulangerie, les soupes en conserve, les vinaigrettes, les céréales à déjeuner, les pâtes alimentaires, les assaisonnements et la sauce soya.</li><li>Votre enfant peut obtenir les mêmes nutriments que ceux contenus dans le blé en consommant d’autres aliments comme les légumes, les fruits, le riz, les pois, les haricots, le lait, le fromage et la viande. Des aliments sécuritaires et sans blé pouvant être une alternative comprennent le quinoa, le millet, l’avoine, l’orge et le maïs.</li><li>Afin de prévenir une réaction allergique, lisez toujours les étiquettes des produits alimentaires, évitez certains aliments si vous n’êtes pas certain des ingrédients qu’ils contiennent et évitez d’utiliser des ustensiles ou des contenants qui pourraient avoir été en contact avec du blé.</li><li>Si l’alimentation de votre enfant est limitée en raison de son allergie au blé, un nutritionniste peut vous conseiller afin d’équilibrer son alimentation.</li></ul><h2>Sources de blé potentielles</h2><p>Le blé est intégré à un large éventail d’aliments emballés. Vous trouverez ci-dessous une liste de quelques-uns des nombreux produits alimentaires contenant du blé :</p><table class="akh-table"><tbody><tr><td>produits de boulangerie et les préparations pour pâtisserie (gâteaux, biscuits, beignes, muffins);</td><td>levure chimique, farine, sucre à glacer;</td></tr><tr><td>aliments panés ou frits;</td><td>céréales à déjeuner, craquelins et pâtes alimentaires;</td></tr><tr><td>soupes en conserve (soupes épaissies);</td><td>substituts de café;</td></tr><tr><td>amidon gélatinisé ou modifié;</td><td>crème glacée;</td></tr><tr><td>liants et agents de remplissage pour la viande, le poisson et la volaille (trouvés principalement dans les charcuteries et les hot-dogs);</td><td>arômes naturels (issus du malt ou du blé);</td></tr><tr><td>garnitures à tartes;</td><td>ketchup et moutarde préparés;</td></tr><tr><td>vinaigrettes, sauces et fonds;</td><td>assaisonnements, épices;</td></tr><tr><td>grignotines (bonbon, barres de chocolat);</td><td>sauce soya;</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Réduire le risque de contamination croisée</h2><p>La contamination croisée se produit lorsqu’une substance inoffensive entre en contact avec une substance nocive, un allergène potentiel ou une bactérie nuisible, par exemple. Si les substances se mélangent, la substance nocive altère l’autre substance, la rendant non sécuritaire à la consommation.</p><p>Les allergènes alimentaires peuvent contaminer d’autres aliments lorsque, par exemple, les mêmes contenants, ustensiles ou poêles entrent en contact avec une variété d’aliments.</p><p>Les contenants d’aliments en vrac entraînent un risque élevé de contamination croisée puisqu’ils sont souvent utilisés pour différents produits.</p><p>Assurez-vous d’éviter d’utiliser des ustensiles ou des contenants qui pourraient être entrés en contact avec des aliments pouvant causer des allergies et informez-vous des contaminations croisées possibles lorsque vous mangez à l’extérieur.</p><h2>Comment puis-je m’assurer que mon enfant reçoit tous les nutriments nécessaires s’il doit éviter le blé?</h2><p>Les principaux nutriments contenus dans le blé sont les fibres alimentaires, les protéines, les vitamines du groupe B, le folate, le fer, le magnésium et le zinc. Votre enfant peut obtenir ces nutriments même s’il doit éviter le blé.</p><h3>Les nutriments présents dans le blé que l’on retrouve dans d’autres aliments</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Nutriment</th><th>Où le trouver</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Fibres</td><td>Légumes, fruits</td></tr><tr><td>Protéine</td><td>Viande, poisson, volaille, œufs, fromage, lait, légumineuses et soya</td></tr><tr><td>Vitamines du groupe B</td><td>riz, lait, fromage, bœuf</td></tr><tr><td>Folate</td><td>Légumes feuillus verts, légumineuses (haricots blancs, haricots pinto, haricots rouges, pois chiches) et lentilles</td></tr><tr><td>Fer</td><td>Épinard, purée de tomates, edamame (fève de soya), fèves de Lima, pois mange-tout, gruau instantané, céréales à déjeuner</td></tr><tr><td>Magnésium</td><td>pois, graines de citrouille, de courge ou de sésame</td></tr><tr><td>Zinc</td><td>Viande, poisson, volaille, légumes</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Pains et céréales sans blé</h2><p>Une allergie au blé ne signifie pas que votre enfant doive éviter toutes les céréales, les pains, les pâtes alimentaires ou les produits de boulangerie. Des alternatives sécuritaires et sans blé existent, dont les produits faits de riz, de maïs, de pomme de terre, de sorgho, d’avoine, d’orge, d’amarante, de sarrasin, de tapioca, de millet, de marante, de soya, de lentilles, de pois, de haricots et de quinoa. Les aliments étiquetés « sans gluten » sont aussi sécuritaires à la consommation puisque tous les aliments sans-gluten sont aussi sans blé. Lisez toujours les étiquettes nutritionnelles afin de vous assurer que la liste des ingrédients n’a pas changé.</p> <h2>Quand consulter un nutritionniste à propos d’une allergie au blé?</h2><p>Si vous avez retiré plusieurs aliments de l’alimentation de votre enfant en raison d’une allergie au blé, vous devriez consulter un nutritionniste. Il peut examiner les aliments que votre enfant a conservés dans son alimentation afin de vérifier s’il obtient les nutriments dont il a besoin. Si nécessaire, il peut recommander des aliments de remplacement que votre enfant peut manger de façon sécuritaire, comme les options sans blé énumérées ci-haut.</p><h2>Informations complémentaires</h2><p>Santé Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/fr/sante-canada/services/aliments-nutrition/rapports-publications/salubrite-aliments/allergene-alimentaire-prioritaire.html">Blé et triticale - Allergènes alimentaires prioritaires</a></p>

 

 

 

 

Wheat allergy813.000000000000Wheat allergyWheat allergyWEnglishAllergyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BodyImmune systemConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2021-03-08T05:00:00Z8.9000000000000059.20000000000001061.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Find out how to help your child manage a wheat allergy.</p><h2>What is a wheat allergy?</h2><p>A wheat allergy occurs when the body reacts to one or more of the proteins found in wheat.</p><p>A wheat allergy is very different from a condition known as <a href="/Article?contentid=816&language=English">celiac disease</a>. With celiac disease, a person cannot tolerate gluten, a different protein found in wheat and other grains.</p><h2>How serious is a wheat allergy?</h2><p>Wheat allergy reactions are different for each child, but they usually happen soon after your child consumes wheat. Inhaling wheat flour can also trigger a reaction in some children.</p><p>A wheat allergy carries the risk of <a href="/Article?contentid=781&language=English">anaphylaxis</a>, a severe and life-threatening allergic reaction.</p><h2>Other names for wheat</h2> <p>Wheat can have many names in ingredient lists. Learning these names can help you catch any hidden sources of wheat in food.</p> <p>When buying packaged foods, always check the list of ingredients in the store and again when you bring the product home. It is also a good idea to check the ingredients every time you buy the food in case the recipe has changed. You can also call the manufacturer to ask about any recipe changes.</p> <p>The following table lists some names for wheat. Use it when you are grocery shopping or calling food manufacturers.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Bulgur</td> <td>Couscous​</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Durum</td> <td>​Enriched, graham, white or whole wheat flour</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Farina</td> <td>Gluten</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Kamut​</td> <td>Semolina</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Spelt​</td> <td>Triticale</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Wheat bran, wheat germ​</td> <td> </td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>A child with a wheat allergy will usually outgrow it as they get older. The protein responsible for a wheat allergy is different from that responsible for a gluten intolerance. </li><li>Other names for wheat include bulgur, farina, spelt, couscous, semolina and graham flour. Food products that contain wheat include baked goods, canned soups, salad dressings, cereals, pastas, seasonings and soy sauce.</li><li>Your child can get the nutrients in wheat from other foods such as vegetables, fruit, rice, peas, beans, milk, cheese and meat. Safe wheat-free grain alternatives include quinoa, millet, oats, barley and corn. </li><li>To prevent an allergic reaction, always read food product labels, avoid foods if you are not sure of the ingredients and avoid using utensils or containers that might have come in contact with wheat.</li><li>If your child's diet is limited because of a wheat allergy, a registered dietitian can offer advice on getting a balanced diet.</li></ul><h2>Possible sources of wheat</h2> <p>Wheat is used in a range of packaged foods. Below is a list of some of the many food products that contain wheat.</p> <table class="akh-table"> <tbody> <tr> <td>Baked goods and baking mixes (cakes, cookies, donuts, muffins)</td> <td>Baking powder, flour, icing sugar</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Battered or fried foods</td> <td>Bread, cereals, crackers, pastas</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Canned soups (“thickened” soups)</td> <td>​Coffee substitutes</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Gelatinized or modified starch</td> <td>Ice cream</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Meat, fish and poultry binders and fillers (found mainly in deli meats and hot dogs)</td> <td>Natural flavouring (from malt or wheat)</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Pie fillings</td> <td>Prepared ketchup, mustard</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Salad dressings, sauces, gravy</td> <td>Seasonings, spices</td> </tr> <tr> <td>Snack foods (candy, chocolate bars)</td> <td>Soy sauce</td> </tr> </tbody> </table><h2>What do I do if my child has a wheat allergy?</h2><p>Your child should see an allergist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating allergies) who can discuss the wheat allergy with you in more detail. Children who have a wheat allergy should avoid all products that may contain wheat.</p><p>Your child’s doctor may also prescribe a medication called an <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/article?contentid=130&language=English">epinephrine auto-injector</a>, which can be used to treat allergic reactions, in case your child accidentally eats a food containing wheat.</p><h2>Reducing the risk of cross-contamination</h2><p>Cross-contamination occurs when one substance unintentionally comes in contact with another substance, for example a potential allergen. If the substances mix together, one substance taints the other substance, making it unsafe to eat.</p><p>Food allergens can contaminate other foods when, for example, the same containers, utensils or frying pans hold a range of foods.</p><p>Bulk food containers pose a high risk of cross-contamination because they are often used for different products.</p><p>Be sure to avoid using utensils or containers that may have come in contact with allergy-causing foods and ask about possible cross-contamination when eating out.</p><h2>How can my child get the right mix of nutrients if they must avoid wheat?</h2><p>The main nutrients in wheat include fibre, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1444&language=English">protein</a>, B vitamins, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1449&language=English">folate</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1450&language=English">iron</a>, <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1451&language=English">magnesium</a> and <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=1452&language=English">zinc</a>. Your child can still get these nutrients even if they must avoid wheat.</p><h3>Nutrients in wheat that are found in other foods</h3><table class="akh-table"><thead><tr><th>Nutrient</th><th>Where to find it</th></tr></thead><tbody><tr><td>Fibre</td><td>Vegetables, fruit</td></tr><tr><td>Protein</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, eggs, cheese, milk, beans, soy</td></tr><tr><td>B vitamins</td><td>Rice, milk, cheese, beef</td></tr><tr><td>Folate</td><td>Leafy green vegetables, beans (navy, pinto, kidney, garbanzo), lentils</td></tr><tr><td>Iron</td><td>Spinach, tomato puree, edamame (soy beans), lima beans, snow peas, instant oatmeal, cereal</td></tr><tr><td>Magnesium</td><td>Peas, pumpkin, squash or sesame seeds</td></tr><tr><td>Zinc</td><td>Meat, fish, poultry, vegetables</td></tr></tbody></table><h2>Wheat-free bread and cereal alternatives</h2><p>A wheat allergy does not mean that your child must avoid all cereals, breads, pastas or baked goods. Safe, wheat-free alternatives include products made from rice, corn, potato, sorghum, oats, barley, amaranth, buckwheat, tapioca, millet, arrowroot, soy, lentils, peas, beans and quinoa. Foods labelled “gluten free” are also safe to eat since all gluten-free foods are also free of wheat. Always read the nutrition label to make sure ingredients have not changed.</p><h2>When to go to the emergency room</h2><p>If your child is having a severe allergic reaction to wheat, call 911 or go to your nearest emergency department immediately. If your child’s doctor prescribed them an epinephrine autoinjector, administer this medication to your child right away. See <a href="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Article?contentid=781&language=English">Anaphylaxis: How to recognize and respond to a severe allergic reaction</a> for more information.</p><h2>When to see a dietitian for a wheat allergy</h2><p>If you have removed many foods from your child's diet because of a wheat allergy, it may be a good idea to speak to a registered dietitian. The dietitian can review the foods your child still eats to decide if they are getting enough nutrients. If necessary, they can also recommend alternative foods that your child can eat safely, such as the wheat-free options above.</p><h2>Will my child always have a wheat allergy?</h2><p>Most children will outgrow a wheat allergy as they get older. An allergist can help you find out when to test your child and see whether they have outgrown their allergy.</p><h2>​Further information</h2><p>Health Canada. <a href="https://www.canada.ca/en/health-canada/services/food-nutrition/reports-publications/food-safety/wheat-priority-food-allergen.html" target="_blank">Wheat & Triticale - Priority food allergens</a></p><img alt="" src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/wheat_allergy.jpg" style="BORDER:0px solid;" />https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/AKHAssets/wheat_allergy.jpgWheat allergyFalse

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.

Our Sponsors