Adenoidectomy with obstructive sleep apnea: Caring for your child after the operationAAdenoidectomy with obstructive sleep apnea: Caring for your child after the operationAdenoidectomy with obstructive sleep apnea: Caring for your child after the operationEnglishOtolaryngologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Nose;MouthMouth;Lymph nodes;NoseNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-05-04T04:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP68.00000000000007.000000000000001230.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Children undergoing an adenoidectomy with obstructive sleep apnea require extra attention following surgery. Read about adenoidectomy and recovery. </p><p>Your child needs an operation called an adenoidectomy (say: ADD-uh-noy-DECK-toe-mee) to take out their adenoids.</p><p>Your child also has <a href="/Article?contentid=1918&language=English">obstructive sleep apnea (OSA)</a>. This means your child will need to be closely watched after the operation. Your child may also have to stay in hospital longer than the other children having an adenoidectomy.</p><p>This brochure explains what to expect while your child is in the hospital and how to take care of your child at home.</p><h2>What are adenoids?</h2><p>Adenoids are lumps of tissue, up behind the nose. Adenoids cannot be seen when looking in the mouth.</p><p>Sometimes, adenoids become <a href="/Article?contentid=831&language=English">enlarged</a> and can cause breathing problems.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Adenoids</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Adenoids_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">The adenoids are located behind the nose.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>What is obstructive sleep apnea?</h2><p>Sleep apnea (say: AP-nee-uh) means that your child goes through long pauses between breaths while sleeping. The obstructive part of <a href="/Article?contentid=1918&language=English">OSA</a> means that the pauses are caused by an obstruction or blockage. OSA can occur when the adenoids have become large enough to cause some blockage of your child's air passages.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Your child will have an operation to remove their enlarged adenoids. </li> <li>You child will be asleep and feel no pain when the adenoids are removed. </li> <li>Most children can go home the morning after the operation. </li> <li>It will take a few days before your child can return to their regular activities and diet.</li> </ul><h2>Reasons to call the doctor</h2> <p>Please call your child's otolaryngologist, the otolaryngology clinic nurse, or your family doctor, if your child has any of the following signs after going home. </p> <ul> <li>fever of 38.5°C (101°F) or higher </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) that does not stop </li> <li>pain that gets worse </li> <li>refusing to drink </li> <li>fresh blood in the nose or mouth </li> </ul> <p>If your child is bleeding or having trouble breathing, or if you are worried, do not wait. Take your child to the closest emergency department.</p> <h3>Write down contact information here:</h3> <p>Otolaryngologist's name and number:</p> <p>Otolaryngology clinic number:</p> <p>Family doctor's name and number:</p><h2>Removing enlarged adenoids</h2> <p>Your child may have had enlarged adenoids since birth, or they may have grown too large from repeated infections. The enlarged adenoids are interfering with your child's breathing, especially at night when they are sleeping. Taking out the adenoids will improve breathing. If your child often has ear infections, an adenoidectomy may help them have fewer ear infections. </p> <p>An otolaryngologist (say: OH-toe-LAR-ing-GOLL-oh-jist) will do the operation. An otolaryngologist is a doctor who specializes in problems with the ears, nose and throat./p></p><h2>Surgery to remove the adenoids</h2> <p>The doctor will give your child a special sleep medicine called a <a href="/Article?contentid=1261&language=English">general anaesthetic</a>. This will make sure your child sleeps through the operation and does not feel any pain. </p> <p>While your child is asleep, the doctor will take out the adenoids through your child's mouth. The doctor will then stop the bleeding. Your child will not get stitches. </p> <p>The operation will take between 20 and 45 minutes.</p> <h2>You will be able to see your child when they are fully awake</h2> <p>A volunteer from the Surgical Waiting Room will bring you to see your child.</p><h2>After the operation</h2><p>After the operation, we will take your child to the recovery room, also called the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">Post Anesthetic Care Unit (PACU)</a>. This is where your child will wake up. Your child will stay in the <a href="/Article?contentid=1262&language=English">PACU</a> for about one hour. Then your child will be taken to a special constant observation room on the otolaryngology inpatient unit. Your child will stay in this room overnight. A nurse will watch over your child at all times. </p><h3>Your child will be closely monitored overnight</h3><ul><li>An electronic monitor will be attached to your child to help the nurse watch your child's breathing. </li><li>Your child will be encouraged to take fluids by mouth. Your child will start with sips of clear fluids (fluids you can see through), ice chips or freezies. Once your child can take sips, they can then drink liquids from a cup. </li><li>Your child's temperature will be taken often. </li><li>Your child will still have an IV in their arm. It may be needed for fluids or medicine.</li><li>Your child will be given pain medicine if needed. </li><li>The nursing staff will watch your child for vomiting or bleeding. </li><li>The nurses will notify the otolaryngologist if there are any complications. </li><li>When your child is fully awake, they may get up with help to use the washroom. </li><li>Your child may throw up thick liquid that is a brownish colour, if they have swallowed some blood during or after the operation. This is normal. If your child keeps throwing up, we will give them medicine through the IV to help settle their upset stomach. </li></ul><p>One parent may stay overnight with your child. However, there is no space for a parent's sleep cot in the constant observation room. </p><h2>Managing your child's pain after the operation</h2><p>If your child has pain after the operation, we will give them pain medicine either through the intravenous (IV) tube in the arm or by a liquid to swallow. Your child should have very little pain after the operation. </p><h2>Most children go home in the morning</h2><p>Your child will be seen by the otolaryngology doctors the afternoon of the operation and early the next morning. If your child is drinking and had no problems overnight, they should be able to go home in the morning. </p><h2>Before the operation</h2> <p>Several hours before the operation, your child will need to stop eating and drinking. The doctor or nurse will tell you when your child must stop eating and drinking. </p> <h3>Write this information down here:</h3> <p>The date and time of the operation:</p> <p>When your child must stop eating:</p> <p>When your child must stop drinking clear fluids:</p> <p>Other things to remember:</p> <p> </p>
Adénoïdectomie et apnée obstructive du sommeil : prendre soin de votre enfant après l’opérationAAdénoïdectomie et apnée obstructive du sommeil : prendre soin de votre enfant après l’opérationAdenoidectomy with obstructive sleep apnea: Caring for your child after the operationFrenchOtolaryngologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Nose;MouthMouth;Lymph nodes;NoseNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-05-04T04:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP68.00000000000007.000000000000001230.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Les enfants souffrant d’apnée obstructive du sommeil qui subissent une adénoïdectomie nécessitent une attention spéciale après la chirurgie.</p><p>Votre enfant doit subir une opération appelée adénoïdectomie afin d’enlever ses amygdales.</p> <p>Votre enfant souffre également d’apnée obstructive du sommeil (AOS), ce qui signifie qu’il devra être surveillé de près après l’opération. Il se peut que votre enfant doive rester plus longtemps à l’hôpital que les autres enfants qui subissent une adénoïdectomie.</p> <p>Cet article explique ce à quoi vous devez vous attendre lorsque votre enfant est à l’hôpital et comment vous occuper de lui à la maison.</p> <h2>Que sont les amygdales?</h2> <p>Les amygdales sont des amas de tissu situés en haut derrière le nez. Vous ne pouvez pas voir les amygdales de votre enfant lorsque vous regardez dans sa bouche.</p> <p>Il arrive parfois que les amygdales enflent trop et causent des problèmes respiratoires.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Adénoïdes</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Adenoids_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Les adénoïdes sont situées derrière le nez.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Qu’est-ce que l’apnée obstructive du sommeil (AOS)?</h2> <p>L’apnée du sommeil signifie qu’il y a de longues pauses entre chaque respiration lorsque votre enfant dort. La partie « obstructive » de l’AOS signifie que les pauses sont causées par une obstruction ou un blocage. L’AOS peut survenir lorsque les amygdales sont assez enflées pour provoquer un blocage des voies respiratoires de votre enfant.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Les amygdales enflées de votre enfant seront enlevées au moyen d’une intervention chirurgicale.</li> <li>Votre enfant sera endormi et ne ressentira aucune douleur lorsqu’on procèdera à l’ablation de ces amygdales.</li> <li>La majorité des enfants peuvent retourner à la maison le lendemain de l’opération.</li> <li>Quelques jours seront nécessaires avant que votre enfant ne puisse reprendre ses activités et ses repas habituels.</li> </ul><h2>Raisons pour appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Veuillez appeler l’ORL de votre enfant, l’infirmière de la clinique ORL ou votre médecin de famille si votre enfant présente l’un ou l’autre des signes suivants après être retourné à la maison : </p> <ul> <li>il fait 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus de fièvre</li> <li>il vomit sans arrêt</li> <li>la douleur s’amplifie</li> <li>il refuse de boire</li> <li>il saigne du nez ou de la bouche </li> </ul> <p>Si votre enfant saigne ou a de la difficulté à respirer, ou si vous êtes inquiets, n’attendez pas. Rendez-vous au service des urgences le plus près.</p> <h3>Inscrivez les coordonnées ici :</h3> <p>Le nom et le numéro de l’ORL :</p> <p>Le numéro de la clinique d’ORL :</p> <p>Le nom et le numéro du médecin de famille :</p><h2>Ablation des amygdales enflées</h2> <p>Votre enfant peut avoir des amygdales enflées depuis la naissance, ou elles peuvent avoir enflé à la suite d’infections répétées. Les amygdales enflées peuvent nuire à la respiration de votre enfant, surtout pendant son sommeil. L’ablation des amygdales améliore la respiration. Si votre enfant a souvent des otites, l’adénoïdectomie peut l’aider à en avoir moins souvent.</p> <p>La chirurgie sera effectuée par un otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL). L’ORL est un médecin qui est spécialisé dans les troubles de l'oreille, du nez et de la gorge.</p><h2>Chirurgie pour l’ablation des amygdales</h2> <p>Le médecin administrera à votre enfant un médicament pour qu’il s’endorme appelé un anesthésique général. Ainsi, votre enfant dormira tout au long de l’opération et ne ressentira aucune douleur.</p> <p>Pendant que votre enfant dort, le médecin procèdera à l’ablation des amygdales par la bouche. Le médecin arrêtera ensuite le saignement et votre enfant n’aura pas de points de suture.</p> <p>L’opération sera d’une durée de 20 à 45 minutes.</p> <h2>Vous pourrez voir votre enfant aussitôt qu’il sera complètement réveillé</h2> <p>Un volontaire de la salle d’attente de la chirurgie vous invitera à aller voir votre enfant.</p><h2>Après l’opération</h2> <p>Après l’opération, votre enfant sera conduit en salle de réveil, aussi appelée l’unité de soins post-anesthésiques. C’est à cet endroit que votre enfant se réveillera. Il restera dans cette salle pendant environ une heure. On l’amènera ensuite dans une salle spéciale d’observation constante de l’unité d’hospitalisation en otorhinolaryngologie, où il passera la nuit. Une infirmière veillera sur lui en tout temps.</p> <h3>Votre enfant sera suivi de près toute la nuit</h3> <ul> <li>Votre enfant sera branché à un appareil électronique de surveillance (monitorage) afin d’aider l’infirmière à observer sa respiration.</li> <li>On encouragera votre enfant à boire. Il commencera par de petites gorgées de liquides limpides (ou transparents), des morceaux de glace ou des sucettes glacées (popsicle). Une fois que votre enfant pourra avaler des petites gorgées, il pourra boire des liquides dans un verre.</li> <li>On prendra souvent la température de votre enfant.</li> <li>Votre enfant aura encore une intraveineuse (IV) dans le bras. On peut en avoir besoin pour les fluides ou les médicaments.</li> <li>On administrera des analgésiques (médicaments anti-douleur) à votre enfant au besoin.</li> <li>Le personnel infirmier surveillera votre enfant au cas où il vomirait ou saignerait.</li> <li>Les infirmières informeront l’ORL s’il y a des complications.</li> <li>Lorsqu’il sera complètement réveillé, votre enfant pourra se lever avec de l’aide pour aller aux toilettes.</li> <li>Il est possible que votre enfant vomisse des liquides épais et brunâtres s’il a avalé du sang pendant ou après l’opération, ce qui est normal. Si ces vomissements persistent, on lui administrera des médicaments par l’IV pour l'empêcher d'être malade.</li> </ul> <p>Un des parents peut passer la nuit avec l'enfant. Cependant, il n’y a pas de place pour un petit lit dans la salle d’observation constante.</p> <h2>Gérer la douleur de votre enfant après l’opération</h2> <p>Si votre enfant souffre de douleur après l’opération, on lui donnera des analgésiques soit à l’aide du tube à perfusion IV dans son bras ou d’un liquide à avaler. Votre enfant devrait ressentir très peu de douleur après l’opération. </p> <h2>La majorité des enfants retournent à la maison le lendemain matin</h2> <p>Votre enfant sera vu par l’ORL l’après-midi de l’opération et tôt le lendemain matin. Si votre enfant boit et n’a eu aucun problème pendant la nuit, il devrait pouvoir retourner à la maison avant midi. </p><h2>Avant l’opération</h2> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l’opération, votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. Votre médecin ou votre infirmière vous dira quand commencer le jeûne. </p> <h3>Inscrivez l’information ici :</h3> <p>La date et l’heure de l’opération :</p> <p>Le moment où votre enfant doit cesser de manger :</p> <p>Le moment où votre enfant doit cesser de boire des liquides limpides :</p> <p>Autres choses à se rappeler :</p> <p> </p>

 

 

Adénoïdectomie et apnée obstructive du sommeil : prendre soin de votre enfant après l’opération1210.00000000000Adénoïdectomie et apnée obstructive du sommeil : prendre soin de votre enfant après l’opérationAdenoidectomy with obstructive sleep apnea: Caring for your child after the operationAFrenchOtolaryngologyToddler (13-24 months);Preschooler (2-4 years);School age child (5-8 years);Pre-teen (9-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)Nose;MouthMouth;Lymph nodes;NoseNon-drug treatmentCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2012-05-04T04:00:00ZKathy Eres, RN;Tomka George, RN;Pauline Lackey, RN;Paolo Campisi, MSc, MD, FRCSC, FAAP68.00000000000007.000000000000001230.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ProcedureHealth A-Z<p>Les enfants souffrant d’apnée obstructive du sommeil qui subissent une adénoïdectomie nécessitent une attention spéciale après la chirurgie.</p><p>Votre enfant doit subir une opération appelée adénoïdectomie afin d’enlever ses amygdales.</p> <p>Votre enfant souffre également d’apnée obstructive du sommeil (AOS), ce qui signifie qu’il devra être surveillé de près après l’opération. Il se peut que votre enfant doive rester plus longtemps à l’hôpital que les autres enfants qui subissent une adénoïdectomie.</p> <p>Cet article explique ce à quoi vous devez vous attendre lorsque votre enfant est à l’hôpital et comment vous occuper de lui à la maison.</p> <h2>Que sont les amygdales?</h2> <p>Les amygdales sont des amas de tissu situés en haut derrière le nez. Vous ne pouvez pas voir les amygdales de votre enfant lorsque vous regardez dans sa bouche.</p> <p>Il arrive parfois que les amygdales enflent trop et causent des problèmes respiratoires.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Adénoïdes</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Adenoids_MED_ILL_FR.jpg" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Les adénoïdes sont situées derrière le nez.</figcaption> </figure> <h2>Qu’est-ce que l’apnée obstructive du sommeil (AOS)?</h2> <p>L’apnée du sommeil signifie qu’il y a de longues pauses entre chaque respiration lorsque votre enfant dort. La partie « obstructive » de l’AOS signifie que les pauses sont causées par une obstruction ou un blocage. L’AOS peut survenir lorsque les amygdales sont assez enflées pour provoquer un blocage des voies respiratoires de votre enfant.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>Les amygdales enflées de votre enfant seront enlevées au moyen d’une intervention chirurgicale.</li> <li>Votre enfant sera endormi et ne ressentira aucune douleur lorsqu’on procèdera à l’ablation de ces amygdales.</li> <li>La majorité des enfants peuvent retourner à la maison le lendemain de l’opération.</li> <li>Quelques jours seront nécessaires avant que votre enfant ne puisse reprendre ses activités et ses repas habituels.</li> </ul><h2>Traitement de la douleur à domicile</h2> <h3>Douleur</h3> <p>Suivez les directives suivantes quand votre enfant revient à domicile après l’intervention.</p> <p>Vous pouvez donner à votre enfant des médicaments contre la douleur.</p> <p>Vous pourriez recevoir une ordonnance de médicaments contre la douleur avant de quitter l'hôpital. Suivez les instructions relatives à la dose fournies par le pharmacien. Bien que ces médicaments contre la douleur sur ordonnance puissent être bénéfiques, ils peuvent aussi être très dangereux s’ils sont mal utilisés.</p> <p>En utilisant ces médicaments, si vous remarquez des changements dans la respiration ou le niveau de somnolence qui vous inquiètent, cessez la médication et consultez un médecin. Si vous enfant est sans réaction, appelez immédiatement le 911.</p> <p>Ne donnez pas à votre enfant des médicaments en vente libre qui pourraient avoir un effet sédatif (faire somnoler) en même temps que les analgésiques sur ordonnance. Les décongestionnants et les antihistaminiques sont des exemples de tels médicaments. Parlez-en avec votre pharmacien.</p> <p>Vous pouvez donner à votre enfant de l’acétaminophène (comme du Tylenol ou du Tempra) s’il ressent de la douleur. Donnez-lui la dose inscrite sur la bouteille pour un enfant de son âge. Ne lui donnez pas d’ibuprofène (Motrin, Advil ou Midol) ou d'acide acétylsalicylique (aspirine) pendant deux semaines après la chirurgie. Ces médicaments pourraient faire augmenter le risque de saignement de votre enfant après l’opération. Parlez-en à votre infirmière ou votre médecin avant de donner ces médicaments à votre enfant.</p> <h3>Régime</h3> <p>Il est très important que votre enfant boive beaucoup après l’opération. Laissez-le boire autant de liquides qu’il le désire. Lorsqu’il sera capable de boire des liquides sans vomir, il pourra manger des aliments mous. Il peut ensuite reprendre son régime habituel.</p> <h3>Soins de la bouche</h3> <p>Votre enfant peut se rincer la bouche avec de l’eau ou se brosser les dents en douceur. Ne le laissez pas se gargariser.</p> <p>Apprenez à votre enfant à éternuer la bouche ouverte. Ne le laissez pas se moucher pendant au moins une semaine après l’opération. Il devrait se tamponner le nez avec un mouchoir s’il coule. </p> <p>Afin d’aider votre enfant à mieux respirer, vous pouvez utiliser un appareil appelé un humidificateur. Il brumise l'eau et humidifie l'air . Placez-le au chevet de votre enfant. </p> <p>Votre enfant peut sembler parler du nez. C’est normal. Cela peut durer quelques semaines ou jusqu’à trois mois, si les amygdales étaient très enflées.</p> <h3>Activité</h3> <ul> <li>Votre enfant devrait rester le plus tranquille possible pendant deux à trois jours après l’opération. Demandez à votre ORL quand votre enfant pourra de nouveau jfaire des sports de contact.</li> <li>Votre enfant peut prendre sa douche ou son bain comme à l’habitude.</li> <li>Il devrait se tenir à l'écart des foules et des gens qui ont des infections et des rhumes.</li> <li>Votre enfant peut retourner à l’école ou à la garderie cinq jours après l’opération. Vous devriez attendre deux semaines avant de laisser votre enfant faire de longs voyages.</li> </ul><h2>Raisons pour appeler le médecin</h2> <p>Veuillez appeler l’ORL de votre enfant, l’infirmière de la clinique ORL ou votre médecin de famille si votre enfant présente l’un ou l’autre des signes suivants après être retourné à la maison : </p> <ul> <li>il fait 38,5°C (101°F) ou plus de fièvre</li> <li>il vomit sans arrêt</li> <li>la douleur s’amplifie</li> <li>il refuse de boire</li> <li>il saigne du nez ou de la bouche </li> </ul> <p>Si votre enfant saigne ou a de la difficulté à respirer, ou si vous êtes inquiets, n’attendez pas. Rendez-vous au service des urgences le plus près.</p> <h3>Inscrivez les coordonnées ici :</h3> <p>Le nom et le numéro de l’ORL :</p> <p>Le numéro de la clinique d’ORL :</p> <p>Le nom et le numéro du médecin de famille :</p><h2>Votre enfant peut avoir besoin d’un suivi</h2> <p>L’infirmière de la clinique d’ORL vous appellera dans un délai de deux semaines après l’opération afin de voir si votre enfant à des problèmes et s’il doit revoir le médecin. Si votre ORL a demandé à revoir votre enfant à la clinique, on lui fixera un rendez-vous.</p><h2>Ablation des amygdales enflées</h2> <p>Votre enfant peut avoir des amygdales enflées depuis la naissance, ou elles peuvent avoir enflé à la suite d’infections répétées. Les amygdales enflées peuvent nuire à la respiration de votre enfant, surtout pendant son sommeil. L’ablation des amygdales améliore la respiration. Si votre enfant a souvent des otites, l’adénoïdectomie peut l’aider à en avoir moins souvent.</p> <p>La chirurgie sera effectuée par un otorhinolaryngologiste (ORL). L’ORL est un médecin qui est spécialisé dans les troubles de l'oreille, du nez et de la gorge.</p><h2>Chirurgie pour l’ablation des amygdales</h2> <p>Le médecin administrera à votre enfant un médicament pour qu’il s’endorme appelé un anesthésique général. Ainsi, votre enfant dormira tout au long de l’opération et ne ressentira aucune douleur.</p> <p>Pendant que votre enfant dort, le médecin procèdera à l’ablation des amygdales par la bouche. Le médecin arrêtera ensuite le saignement et votre enfant n’aura pas de points de suture.</p> <p>L’opération sera d’une durée de 20 à 45 minutes.</p> <h2>Vous pourrez voir votre enfant aussitôt qu’il sera complètement réveillé</h2> <p>Un volontaire de la salle d’attente de la chirurgie vous invitera à aller voir votre enfant.</p><h2>Après l’opération</h2> <p>Après l’opération, votre enfant sera conduit en salle de réveil, aussi appelée l’unité de soins post-anesthésiques. C’est à cet endroit que votre enfant se réveillera. Il restera dans cette salle pendant environ une heure. On l’amènera ensuite dans une salle spéciale d’observation constante de l’unité d’hospitalisation en otorhinolaryngologie, où il passera la nuit. Une infirmière veillera sur lui en tout temps.</p> <h3>Votre enfant sera suivi de près toute la nuit</h3> <ul> <li>Votre enfant sera branché à un appareil électronique de surveillance (monitorage) afin d’aider l’infirmière à observer sa respiration.</li> <li>On encouragera votre enfant à boire. Il commencera par de petites gorgées de liquides limpides (ou transparents), des morceaux de glace ou des sucettes glacées (popsicle). Une fois que votre enfant pourra avaler des petites gorgées, il pourra boire des liquides dans un verre.</li> <li>On prendra souvent la température de votre enfant.</li> <li>Votre enfant aura encore une intraveineuse (IV) dans le bras. On peut en avoir besoin pour les fluides ou les médicaments.</li> <li>On administrera des analgésiques (médicaments anti-douleur) à votre enfant au besoin.</li> <li>Le personnel infirmier surveillera votre enfant au cas où il vomirait ou saignerait.</li> <li>Les infirmières informeront l’ORL s’il y a des complications.</li> <li>Lorsqu’il sera complètement réveillé, votre enfant pourra se lever avec de l’aide pour aller aux toilettes.</li> <li>Il est possible que votre enfant vomisse des liquides épais et brunâtres s’il a avalé du sang pendant ou après l’opération, ce qui est normal. Si ces vomissements persistent, on lui administrera des médicaments par l’IV pour l'empêcher d'être malade.</li> </ul> <p>Un des parents peut passer la nuit avec l'enfant. Cependant, il n’y a pas de place pour un petit lit dans la salle d’observation constante.</p> <h2>Gérer la douleur de votre enfant après l’opération</h2> <p>Si votre enfant souffre de douleur après l’opération, on lui donnera des analgésiques soit à l’aide du tube à perfusion IV dans son bras ou d’un liquide à avaler. Votre enfant devrait ressentir très peu de douleur après l’opération. </p> <h2>La majorité des enfants retournent à la maison le lendemain matin</h2> <p>Votre enfant sera vu par l’ORL l’après-midi de l’opération et tôt le lendemain matin. Si votre enfant boit et n’a eu aucun problème pendant la nuit, il devrait pouvoir retourner à la maison avant midi. </p><h2>Avant l’opération</h2> <p>Plusieurs heures avant l’opération, votre enfant devra arrêter de manger et de boire. Votre médecin ou votre infirmière vous dira quand commencer le jeûne. </p> <h3>Inscrivez l’information ici :</h3> <p>La date et l’heure de l’opération :</p> <p>Le moment où votre enfant doit cesser de manger :</p> <p>Le moment où votre enfant doit cesser de boire des liquides limpides :</p> <p>Autres choses à se rappeler :</p> <p> </p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Adenoids_MED_ILL_EN.jpgAdénoïdectomie et apnée obstructive du sommeil : prendre soin de votre enfant après l’opération

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.