Hydrocephalus and treatment: Shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomyHHydrocephalus and treatment: Shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomyHydrocephalus and treatment: Shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomyEnglishNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainBrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-04-02T04:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN;Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD8.0000000000000064.00000000000001700.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>Hydrocephalus is a buildup of fluid around the brain. Read about two surgical treatments for hydrocephalus; shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomy. </p><h2>What is hydrocephalus?</h2><p>Hydrocephalus is an abnormal build-up of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the ventricles inside the brain. The ventricles are fluid-filled spaces in the brain. CSF is a clear, colourless fluid that looks like water and contains small amounts of salt, sugar and cells.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Hydrocephalus</span> <div class="asset-animation"> src="https://www.aboutkidshealth.ca/Style%20Library/akh/swfanimations/swf.html?swffile=Hydrocephalus_infant_MED_ANI_EN.swf" </div> </figure> <p>CSF is constantly produced in the ventricles. It moves around the brain and spinal cord, is absorbed and is then replaced by new CSF. Some of the functions of CSF are:</p><ul><li>to protect the brain and spinal cord from injury</li><li>to nourish brain cells, which helps with brain functioning</li><li>to carry waste products from brain cells away</li></ul><p>CSF moves around the brain and spinal cord on a specific pathway. When too much CSF gets trapped anywhere along this pathway, it can expand the ventricles and put pressure on the brain. This condition is called hydrocephalus.</p><p>There are two types of hydrocephalus:</p><ul><li>Communicating hydrocephalus is the build-up of pressure from too much CSF that is not being properly absorbed.</li><li>Non-communicating hydrocephalus is the build-up of pressure from CSF when a blockage occurs within the brain. Some causes of non-communicating hydrocephalus may be a tumour, a blood clot, or a narrowing of part of the CSF pathway found at birth.</li></ul><p>A person born with hydrocephalus is said to have congenital hydrocephalus. Those who develop it later in life are said to have acquired hydrocephalus.</p><h2>Key points</h2> <ul> <li>Hydrocephalus is an abnormal build-up of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the ventricles inside the brain. </li> <li>Hydrocephalus is treated with surgery (an operation) to put in a shunt or create an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). </li> <li>If you see any signs that the shunt or ETV is not working properly, call 911 or emergency services right away. Your child needs medical attention. </li> </ul><h2>Signs of hydrocephalus</h2> <p>To find out if your child has hydrocephalus, the doctor will assess your child and do some tests.</p> <h3>Signs of hydrocephalus in a baby</h3> <p>Your baby may have some or all of the following symptoms:</p> <ul> <li>poor feeding </li> <li>vomiting (throwing up) </li> <li>sleepy (hard to wake up) or not as awake or alert as usual </li> <li>large head (your family doctor can measure this) </li> <li>bulging soft spot (fontanelle) on the top of the head </li> <li>seeming irritable (cries easily or without reason) </li> <li>seizures </li> <li>very noticeable scalp veins </li> <li>slowness at reaching milestones (for example, slow to roll over, slow to sit) </li> <li>"sunset" eyes, when the eyes appear to be always looking down and are not able to look up </li> </ul> <h3>Signs of hydrocephalus in a child</h3> <p>Your child may have some or all of the following symptoms:</p> <ul> <li>headaches </li> <li>nausea and vomiting </li> <li>tired (sleeping more than usual, difficult to wake up, does not want to play as usual) </li> <li>seeming irritable </li> <li>changes in personality, behaviour or school performance </li> <li>loss of coordination </li> <li>seizures </li> <li>changes in vision </li> </ul><h2>Hydrocephalus is diagnosed with CT scan, MRI or ultrasound</h2> <p>Hydrocephalus is often diagnosed with imaging tests. These tests include CT scan, MRI and ultrasound. These technologies give doctors different views of what is going on inside the brain. These imaging tests may reveal a blockage or a build-up of CSF. </p> <p>Using MRI and ultrasound, hydrocephalus is sometimes diagnosed before a child is born.</p> <p>Because CT scans and MRI require a person to be still while the pictures are being taken, some children need to be given sedation medicine to help them keep still during the tests.</p><h2>Hydrocephalus is treated with surgery</h2><p>There are no effective medicines for hydrocephalus. Most children require surgery. The goal is to lessen the pressure in the brain by providing another pathway for CSF to be drained and absorbed away from the brain. </p><p>There are two types of surgery for hydrocephalus:</p><ul><li>The most common treatment is the insertion of a shunt. The shunt works by moving fluid from an area where there is too much CSF to an area where it can be absorbed into the body. </li><li>Some children with non-communicating hydrocephalus can have surgery called an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV). This surgery creates an opening to allow CSF to flow in and around the brain as it should. </li></ul><p>Both these surgeries are described in detail below.</p><h2>Shunt surgery</h2><p>The most common treatment of hydrocephalus is the surgical placement of a shunt. A shunt is a soft, flexible tube.</p><p>The top end of the shunt is placed in the ventricle fluid spaces inside the brain. This tube is attached to a valve that controls the flow of CSF through the shunt. The tube is then tunnelled below the skin to an area of the body where the fluid can be absorbed. One area is the lining of the abdominal cavity (the peritoneum). This is called a ventriculo-peritoneal shunt (VP shunt). </p><p>Less often, the shunt is connected from the brain to other parts of the body:</p><ul><li>A shunt from the brain to the lining around the lung (pleural space) inside the chest is called a ventriculo-pleural shunt. </li><li>A shunt from the brain to veins draining into the heart is called a ventriculo-atrial shunt. </li></ul> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Shunt</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Shunt_MED_ILL_EN.jpg" alt="" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">A shunt is placed in one of the ventricles of the brain. It is threaded under the skin into the abdomen. The shunt drains cerebrospinal fluid into the abdomen where it is reabsorbed by the body.</figcaption> </figure> <h3>There are different types of shunt tubes and valves</h3><p>Your child's neurosurgeon will decide what type of shunt tube is best for your child. All shunts will only allow CSF flow in one direction. Some shunts may also have a small bubble or "reservoir" near the top that the doctor can use to take samples of CSF for testing. </p><p>Sometimes a special type of shunt is needed where the pressure setting is adjustable. This is called a programmable shunt valve. This allows the surgeon to program the shunt to control how much CSF is draining. It is important to remember that the pressure setting of this shunt can be changed by a magnet. MRI scans use large magnets, so if your child needs an MRI you must make sure to tell the doctor first about the shunt. An X-ray may need to be taken after the MRI to make sure that the pressure setting has not been changed. </p><h3>During the shunt operation</h3><p>Your child is brought down to the operating room and goes to sleep under general anesthesia. Your child will not feel any pain during the opreation. </p><p>The area from the head to the abdomen (belly) is scrubbed with a special soap. The surgeon makes incisions (cuts) on the head and abdomen. The shunt tubing is tunnelled just below the skin. The ventricular (top) end of the shunt is passed through a small hole in the skull made by the surgeon and gently passed into the ventricle. The abdominal (bottom) end is passed through a small opening in the abdomen. The incisions are then closed using staples or stitches. </p><p>The operation takes between one and two hours.</p><h2>Endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) surgery</h2><p>An endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) is the second type of surgery done on some children who have hydrocephalus. Your surgeon will tell you if this surgery is possible for your child. </p><p>During an ETV, the surgeon makes an opening in the floor of the ventricle at the base of the brain. The CSF is then no longer blocked inside the ventricle. Now it can flow in and around the brain as it should. </p><p>This means that the child will not need a shunt, but instead will rely on the opening made by the surgeon during surgery. It is still very important to watch your child for signs that the pressure is building up again, as it is possible that the ETV could fail or become blocked. If any signs come back, it is very important to call your surgeon right away so that your child can be checked. </p><h3>During the ETV operation</h3><p>Your child is brought down to the operating room and is put asleep under general anesthesia. Your child will not feel any pain during the operation. An incision is made on the head. A special scope with a camera on it is passed into the ventricle. The surgeon uses the camera to see the part of the ventricle that needs to be opened up. Once the opening is made, the surgeon will be able to see if the CSF is now flowing outside of the ventricle. </p><p>If the surgeon is not able to safely do the ETV, a shunt will be inserted instead. The incisions are then closed using staples or stitches. </p><p>The operation takes between one and two hours.</p><h2>After the shunt or ETV operation</h2><p>Your child is then taken to the Post Anesthetic Care Unit (PACU) recovery room. Your child will wake up soon after the operation. You will be able to see your child as soon as he wakes up. Your child will spend about one to two hours in the PACU to recover from the anesthetic. Then your child will be returned to his room in the neurosurgical unit. </p><p>Your child will have a bandage on the head. If your child received a shunt, they will have another bandage on the abdomen or chest, depending on the type of shunt. </p><p>The nurse will check your child often. They will also be checking to see how easily your child wakes up, even at night.</p><p>Your child will have an intravenous (IV) line after surgery until they are drinking well.</p><p>Your child may have a CT scan after surgery to make sure the ventricles have decreased in size and, if your child needed a shunt, that the shunt is in a good position. </p><h3>Pain after the operation</h3><p>After the operation, your child may have pain at the operative sites. The nurse will give your child medicine by mouth about every four hours. This should control the pain. If it does not control the pain, speak to your child's nurse. </p><p>Your child may also learn other ways to control pain, such as blowing bubbles or relaxation breathing. As your nurse or child life specialist to help you and your child learn how to do this. </p><p>Your child's surgeon will tell you when your child can start normal activity, such as sitting up and walking. After your child has recovered from the surgery, they can go home. </p><h2>Going home after the operation</h2> <p>The shunt may stop working properly after you go home. Sometimes the tube can become blocked, come apart, or break. Or your child may grow taller so that the tube moves out of the abdomen. Or it may become infected. </p> <p>Similarly, an endoscopic third ventriculostomy (ETV) does not guarantee your child's hydrocephalus will never come back. If you notice any signs of hydrocephalus coming back, it is very important to call your surgeon right away. </p> <h3>If the shunt or ETV is not working properly, call for medical help right away</h3> <p>Your child needs medical attention right away if you see any signs or symptoms of a shunt problem or a failed ETV.</p> <p>If your child's shunt or ETV is not working properly, the pressure will return to the brain. Signs that the shunt or ETV is not working are the same as the signs of hydrocephalus, listed above. Your child may have the same signs as before their shunt was put in, or there may be new signs. </p> <p>Signs of a shunt infection include the following:</p> <ul> <li>puffiness or redness of the skin around the tube and at incision (cut) sites</li> <li>a fever </li> <li>a stiff neck </li> <li>fluid coming out of the incision </li> <li>loss of appetite or not eating well </li> <li>generally feeling sick </li> <li>headache </li> <li>abdominal (belly) pain </li> </ul> <p>If your child has any of these symptoms, call 911 or your local emergency services right away. Shunt malfunctions, infections and failed ETVs that are not treated promptly and appropriately can lead to coma and possibly death. </p> <p>To learn more about how these problems are treated, please see <a href="/Article?contentid=954&language=English">Shunt Infections</a> and <a href="/Article?contentid=955&language=English">Shunt Revisions</a>.</p> <h3>Removing staples or sutures</h3> <p>How your child's staples or stitches are taken out depends on the type of staple or stitch that was used. Your surgeon or nurse will tell you what type of stitches were used. </p> <ul> <li>If your child has staples or stitches that need to be taken out, your family doctor will need to do this. The stitches should be taken out about seven to 10 days after the operation. Staples should be removed about 10 days after the operation. Your surgeon or nurse will tell you when they need to come out. </li> <li>If staples were used, you will be given a special remover to take to your family doctor. </li> <li>If your child has the kind of stitches that dissolve on their own, you can see your family doctor to have the incision line checked, but the stitches will not need to be taken out. </li> </ul>
Hydrocéphalie et traitement : Shunts et ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventriculeHHydrocéphalie et traitement : Shunts et ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventriculeHydrocephalus and treatment: Shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomyFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainBrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-04-02T04:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN;Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD8.0000000000000064.00000000000001700.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>L’hydrocéphalie est une accumulation de fluide autour du cerveau. Lisez au sujet des traitements chirurgicaux pour l’hydrocéphalie; shunts et ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule. </p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une hydrocéphalie?</h2> <p>L’hydrocéphalie est une accumulation anormale de liquide céphalorachidien (LCR) dans les ventricules à l’intérieur du cerveau. Les ventricules sont des espaces remplis de fluide dans le cerveau. Le LCR est un fluide clair et incolore qui ressemble à de l’eau et qui contient de petites quantités de sel, de sucre et de cellules.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Hydrocéphalie</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hydrocephalus_static_MED_ILL_FR.png" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Le liquide céphalo-rachidien (LCR) circule dans les ventricules situés à l'intérieur du cerveau, puis à l'extérieur du cerveau et autour de la moelle épinière. Si la circulation du LCR est bloquée, il s'accumule dans les ventricules et exerce une pression sur le cerveau. C'est ce que l'on nomme « l'hydrocéphalie ».</figcaption> </figure> <p>Le LCR est constamment produit dans les ventricules. Il circule dans le cerveau et la moelle épinière, est absorbé et est ensuite remplacé par du nouveau LCR. Voici certaines fonctions du LCR :</p> <ul> <li>protéger le cerveau et la moelle épinière contre les blessures; </li> <li>nourrir les cellules du cerveau, ce qui aide à son fonctionnement; </li> <li>retirer les déchets des cellules du cerveau. </li> </ul> <p>Le LCR circule dans le cerveau et la moelle épinière en suivant un parcours précis. Lorsqu’une trop grande quantité de LCR s’accumule à un endroit dans ce parcours, il peut élargir les ventricules et créer de la pression sur le cerveau. Cette maladie s’appelle une hydrocéphalie. </p> <p>Il y a deux types d’hydrocéphalie.</p> <ul> <li>L’hydrocéphalie communicante est l’accumulation de pression liée à une trop grande quantité de LCR qui n’est pas absorbé adéquatement.</li> <li>L’hydrocéphalie non communicante est l’accumulation de la pression causée par le LCR lorsqu’un blocage survient dans le cerveau. Une tumeur, un caillot de sang ou le rétrécissement d’une partie du parcours du LCR à la naissance font partie des causes de l’hydrocéphalie non communicante.</li> </ul> <p>On dit d’une personne qui vient au monde avec une hydrocéphalie qu’elle souffre d’une «hydrocéphalie congénitale».</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>L’hydrocéphalie est une accumulation anormale de liquide céphalorachidien (LCR) dans les ventricules à l’intérieur du cerveau.</li> <li>L’hydrocéphalie est traitée par la chirurgie (une intervention) qui vise à installer une dérivation ou créer une ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule (VETV).</li> <li>Si vous observez des signes indiquant que la dérivation ou la VETV ne fonctionne pas adéquatement, composez le 911 ou appelez le service d’urgence immédiatement. Votre enfant a besoin d'une attention médicale. </li> </ul><h2>Signes d’hydrocéphalie</h2> <p>Pour savoir si votre enfant souffre d'une hydrocéphalie, le médecin l’évaluera et procédera à quelques examens.</p> <h3>Signes d’hydrocéphalie chez un bébé</h3> <p>Votre bébé pourrait avoir certains ou l’ensemble des symptômes suivants :</p> <ul> <li>manque d’appétit;</li> <li>vomissements (régurgitations);</li> <li>léthargique (difficile à réveiller) ou n’est pas aussi éveillé et alerte que d’habitude;</li> <li>tête de grande taille (votre médecin de famille peut mesurer sa tête);</li> <li>la fontanelle (partie molle) bombée sur le dessus de la tête;</li> <li>semble irritable (pleure facilement et sans raison apparente)</li> <li>crises;</li> <li>veines du crâne très visibles;</li> <li>déplacements lents (par exemple, se retourne ou s’assoie lentement);</li> <li>yeux à demi fermés, lorsque les yeux semblent regarder toujours vers le bas et ne semblent pas pouvoir regarder vers le haut. </li> </ul> <h3>Signes d’hydrocéphalie chez un enfant</h3> <p>Votre enfant pourrait avoir certains ou l’ensemble des symptômes suivants :</p> <ul> <li>maux de tête;</li> <li>nausées et vomissements;</li> <li>fatigue (dort plus que d’habitude, a de la difficulté à rester éveillé, ne veut pas s’amuser comme d’habitude);</li> <li>semble irritable;</li> <li>changements de personnalité, de comportement ou de rendement scolaire;</li> <li>perte de coordination;</li> <li>convulsions;</li> <li>changements dans la vision.</li> </ul><h2>L’hydrocéphalie est diagnostiquée à l’aide d’un tomodensitogramme, un IRM ou une échographie</h2> <p>L’hydrocéphalie est souvent diagnostiquée avec des tests d’imagerie. Ces tests comprennent le tomodensitogramme (scanner), l’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) ou l'échographie. Ces technologies permettent aux médecins d’obtenir différentes images de ce qui se passe à l’intérieur du cerveau. Ces tests d’imagerie peuvent révéler un blocage ou une accumulation de LCR.</p> <p>À l’aide de l’IRM et de l'échographie, l’hydrocéphalie est parfois diagnostiquée avant la naissance de l’enfant.</p> <p>Puisque les tomodensitogrammes et l’IRM nécessitent qu’une personne demeure immobile lorsque les images sont prises, on doit mettre certains enfants sous sédation afin de les aider à ne pas bouger pendant les tests.</p><h2>Traitement de l’hydrocéphalie par la chirurgie</h2> <p>Il n’existe aucun médicament efficace contre l’hydrocéphalie. La plupart des enfants doivent subir une opération de chirurgie. Le but est de diminuer la pression dans le cerveau en créant un autre parcours pour que le LCR puisse circuler et être absorbé à l’extérieur du cerveau. </p> <p>Il y a deux types de chirurgies pour l'hydrocéphalie.</p> <ul> <li>Le traitement le plus commun est l’installation d’une dérivation ou shunt. Le shunt sert à déplacer le fluide d’une zone dans laquelle il y a trop de LCR vers une zone où il peut être absorbé dans le corps. </li> <li>Certains enfants qui souffrent d’une hydrocéphalie non communicante peuvent subir une opération appelée ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule (VETV). Cette chirurgie permet de créer une ouverture en vue de permettre au LCR de circuler comme il se doit à l’intérieur et autour du cerveau. </li> </ul> <p>Les deux chirurgies sont décrites ci-dessous.</p> <h2>Chirurgie de dérivation (shunt)</h2> <p>Le traitement le plus commun de l’hydrocéphalie est l’installation chirurgicale d’une dérivation, c'est-à-dire un tube mou et souple.</p> <p>La partie supérieure de la dérivation est placée dans les espaces des ventricules contenant du fluide dans le cerveau. Ce tube est attaché à une valve qui contrôle le flux de LCR dans la dérivation. Le tube est ensuite glissé sous la peau vers une zone du corps où le liquide peut être absorbé. L’une de ces zones est située sur la paroi de la cavité abdominale (le péritoine). On l’appelle une dérivation ventriculo-péritonéale (shunt VP). </p> <p>Plus rarement, la dérivation connecte le cerveau aux autres parties du corps.</p> <ul> <li>Une dérivation du cerveau vers le revêtement du poumon (la plèvre) à l’intérieur du thorax est appelé une dérivation ventriculo-pleurale.</li> <li>Une dérivation du cerveau vers les veines qui arrivent au cœur est appelé une dérivation ventriculo-atriale.</li> </ul> <h3>Il y a différents types de tubes et de valves de dérivation</h3> <p>Le neurochirurgien de votre enfant décidera du type de tube de dérivation qui est préférable pour votre enfant. Toutes les dérivations permettent seulement au LCR de circuler dans une direction. Certaines dérivations peuvent également comporter une bulle ou un « réservoir » près de la partie supérieure par où le médecin peut prélever des échantillons de LCR afin de les analyser. </p> <p>Il arrive qu’un type particulier de dérivation qui permet d’ajuster la pression soit requis. Il s’agit d’un robinet de dérivation programmable. Cela permet au chirurgien de programmer la dérivation pour contrôler la quantité de LCR drainé. Il ne faut pas oublier que le réglage de la pression de cette dérivation peut être changé par un aimant. L’IRM utilise de gros aimants et, par conséquent, si votre enfant a besoin d'une IRM, mentionnez-le au médecin d’abord. Il pourrait être nécessaire de faire une radiographie après l’IRM afin de s'assurer que les réglages de la pression n’a pas été modifié.</p> <h3>Pendant l’intervention</h3> <p>Votre enfant est conduit à la salle d’opération et placé sous anesthésie générale. Il ne ressentira aucune douleur pendant l’intervention. </p> <p>La partie de la tête à l’abdomen (ventre) est frottée avec un savon spécial. Le chirurgien pratique des incisions (coupures) sur la tête et l’abdomen. La dérivation est glissée directement sous la peau. L’extrémité ventriculaire (partie supérieure) de la dérivation est insérée dans un petit trou percé par le chirurgien dans le crâne, puis glissée avec précaution dans le ventricule. L’extrémité abdominale (partie inférieure) est insérée dans une petite ouverture dans l’abdomen. Les incisions sont ensuite refermées par des agrafes ou des points de suture. </p> <p>L’intervention dure 1 à 2 heures.</p> <h2>Chirurgie de ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule (VETV)</h2> <p>Une ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule est le deuxième type de chirurgie effectuée pour certains enfants qui souffrent d’hydrocéphalie. Votre chirurgien vous dira si cette opération convient à votre enfant. </p> <p>Pendant une VETV, le chirurgien fait une ouverture sur le plancher du ventricule à la base du cerveau. Cela débloque le LCR à l’intérieur du ventricule. Il peut maintenant circuler à l’intérieur et autour du cerveau, comme il se doit. </p> <p>Cela signifie que l’enfant n’aura pas besoin d’une dérivation, remplacée plutôt par l’ouverture faite par le chirurgien pendant l’intervention. Il est tout de même très important d’observer votre enfant afin de repérer des signes qui révèlent que la pression s’accumule à nouveau, puisqu’il est possible que la VETV échoue ou se bloque. Si les signes réapparaissent, il est important de communiquer immédiatement avec le chirurgien pour que votre enfant soit examiné.</p> <h3>Pendant l’intervention de VETV</h3> <p>Votre enfant est conduit à la salle d’opération et placé sous anesthésie générale. Votre enfant ne ressentira aucune douleur pendant l’intervention. Une incision est faite sur la tête. Une tige spéciale munie d’une caméra est insérée dans le ventricule. Le chirurgien utilise la caméra pour voir la partie du ventricule qui doit être ouverte. Une fois que l’ouverture est faite, le chirurgien est en mesure de voir si le LCR circule alors à l’extérieur du ventricule. </p> <p>Si le chirurgien n’est pas en mesure de procéder à la VETV en toute sécurité, il insèrera plutôt une dérivation. Les incisions sont ensuite refermées à l’aide d’agrafes ou de points de suture.</p> <p>L’intervention dure 1 à 2 heures.</p> <h2>Après l’intervention de dérivation ou de VETV</h2> <p>Votre enfant est transporté à la salle de réveil de l’Unité de soins post-anesthésie (USPA). Votre enfant se réveillera peu après l’intervention. Vous pourrez le voir dès qu’il sera réveillé. Il passera 1 ou 2 heures à l’USPA afin de se rétablir de l’anesthésie. Votre enfant retournera ensuite à sa chambre à l’unité de neurochirurgie.</p> <p>Votre enfant aura un bandage sur la tête. Si on lui a posé une dérivation, il aura un deuxième bandage sur l’abdomen ou sur la poitrine, selon le type de dérivation. </p> <p>L’infirmier examinera souvent votre enfant. Il observera également s'il se réveille facilement, même pendant la nuit.</p> <p>Votre enfant aura une perfusion intraveineuse (i.v.) après la chirurgie jusqu’à ce qu’il puisse boire de façon adéquate.</p> <p>Votre enfant pourrait passer un tomodensitogramme après la chirurgie afin de s’assurer que la taille des ventricules a diminué et, si votre enfant avait besoin d’une dérivation, que la position de la dérivation est adéquate. </p> <h3>Douleur après l’intervention</h3> <p>Après l’intervention, il se peut que votre enfant ressente de la douleur aux sites opérés. L’infirmier lui donnera des médicaments pour enfants par la bouche toutes les quatre heures. Cela devrait contrôler la douleur. Dans le cas contraire, dites-le à l’infirmier.</p> <p>Votre enfant pourrait également apprendre d’autres façons de contrôler la douleur, comme souffler des bulles ou la respiration profonde. Demandez à l’infirmier ou à l'éducateur en milieu spécialisé de vous aider à montrer à votre enfant comment s’y prendre.</p> <p>Le chirurgien vous dira quand votre enfant pourra reprendre ses activités normales, telles que s’asseoir et marcher. Votre enfant pourra rentrer à la maison lorsqu’il sera rétabli.</p><h2>Rentrer à la maison après l’intervention</h2> <p>La dérivation pourrait cesser de fonctionner adéquatement après votre retour à la maison. Il arrive que le tube se bloque, se détache ou se brise. De plus, la croissance de votre enfant pourrait faire sortir que le tube de l’abdomen. Il pourrait également s’infecter.</p> <p>De même, une VETV ne garantie pas que l’hydrocéphalie de votre enfant ne reviendra jamais. Si vous remarquez que les signes de l’hydrocéphalie reviennent, il est très important que vous appeliez immédiatement le chirurgien.</p> <h3>Si la dérivation ou la VETV ne fonctionne pas convenablement, appelez immédiatement pour obtenir une assistance médicale</h3> <p>Votre enfant a besoin de soins médicaux immédiats si vous constatez des signes ou des symptômes liés à un problème de dérivation ou à une VETV qui aurait échoué.</p> <p>Si la dérivation ou la VETV de votre enfant ne fonctionne pas convenablement, la pression dans le cerveau reviendra. Les signes qui indiquent que la VETV ne fonctionne pas sont les mêmes que ceux de l’hydrocéphalie (présentés ci-avant). Il se peut que votre enfant affiche les mêmes signes qu’avant l’installation de la dérivation, ou d’autres signes pourraient apparaître.</p> <p>Les signes d’une infection de la dérivation comprennent :</p> <ul> <li>une boursouflure ou une rougeur de la peau autour du tube et des incisions;</li> <li>de la fièvre;</li> <li>une raideur au cou;</li> <li>du fluide qui s’écoule de l’incision;</li> <li>une perte d’appétit ou une mauvaise alimentation;</li> <li>une sensation générale de malaise;</li> <li>des maux de tête;</li> <li>des douleurs abdominales (ventre).</li> </ul> <p>Si votre enfant ressent l’un de ces symptômes, composez le 911 ou appelez le service d’urgence local immédiatement. Le mauvais fonctionnement d’une dérivation, une infection ou l’échec d’une VETV qui n’est pas traité rapidement et de façon adéquate peut causer un coma et, possiblement, la mort..</p> <h3>Retirer les agrafes ou les points de suture</h3> <p>La façon d’enlever les agrafes ou les points de votre enfant dépend du type utilisé. Le chirurgien ou l’infirmier vous précisera le type d’agrafes qui a été utilisé.</p> <ul> <li>Si votre enfant a des agrafes ou des points de suture qui doivent être retirés, votre médecin de famille devra le faire. Les points de suture doivent être retirés environ 7 à 10 jours après l’intervention. Les agrafes devraient être retirées environ 10 jours après l'intervention. Le chirurgien ou l’infirmier vous dira quand il faut les retirer.</li> <li>Si des agrafes ont été utilisées, on vous donnera un outil spécial à remettre à votre médecin de famille pour qu'il retire les agraphes.</li> <li>Si votre enfant a des points de suture résorbables (qui disparaissent tout seuls), vous pouvez rendre visite à votre médecin de famille afin qu’il examine la cicatrice de l’incision, mais les points n'auront pas être retirés.</li> </ul>

 

 

Hydrocéphalie et traitement : Shunts et ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule858.000000000000Hydrocéphalie et traitement : Shunts et ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventriculeHydrocephalus and treatment: Shunts and endoscopic third ventriculostomyHFrenchNeurologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainBrainConditions and diseasesCaregivers Adult (19+)NA2009-04-02T04:00:00ZMary Douglas, RN, KRN, BScN, MN;James Drake, BSE, MB, BCh, MSc, FRCSC;Patricia Rowe, RN, BScN, MN, NP Peds;Sheila Rowed, RN, BScN;Shobhan Vachhrajani, MD8.0000000000000064.00000000000001700.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>L’hydrocéphalie est une accumulation de fluide autour du cerveau. Lisez au sujet des traitements chirurgicaux pour l’hydrocéphalie; shunts et ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule. </p><h2>Qu’est-ce qu’une hydrocéphalie?</h2> <p>L’hydrocéphalie est une accumulation anormale de liquide céphalorachidien (LCR) dans les ventricules à l’intérieur du cerveau. Les ventricules sont des espaces remplis de fluide dans le cerveau. Le LCR est un fluide clair et incolore qui ressemble à de l’eau et qui contient de petites quantités de sel, de sucre et de cellules.</p> <figure> <span class="asset-image-title">Hydrocéphalie</span> <img src="https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hydrocephalus_static_MED_ILL_FR.png" /> <figcaption class="asset-image-caption">Le liquide céphalo-rachidien (LCR) circule dans les ventricules situés à l'intérieur du cerveau, puis à l'extérieur du cerveau et autour de la moelle épinière. Si la circulation du LCR est bloquée, il s'accumule dans les ventricules et exerce une pression sur le cerveau. C'est ce que l'on nomme « l'hydrocéphalie ».</figcaption> </figure> <p>Le LCR est constamment produit dans les ventricules. Il circule dans le cerveau et la moelle épinière, est absorbé et est ensuite remplacé par du nouveau LCR. Voici certaines fonctions du LCR :</p> <ul> <li>protéger le cerveau et la moelle épinière contre les blessures; </li> <li>nourrir les cellules du cerveau, ce qui aide à son fonctionnement; </li> <li>retirer les déchets des cellules du cerveau. </li> </ul> <p>Le LCR circule dans le cerveau et la moelle épinière en suivant un parcours précis. Lorsqu’une trop grande quantité de LCR s’accumule à un endroit dans ce parcours, il peut élargir les ventricules et créer de la pression sur le cerveau. Cette maladie s’appelle une hydrocéphalie. </p> <p>Il y a deux types d’hydrocéphalie.</p> <ul> <li>L’hydrocéphalie communicante est l’accumulation de pression liée à une trop grande quantité de LCR qui n’est pas absorbé adéquatement.</li> <li>L’hydrocéphalie non communicante est l’accumulation de la pression causée par le LCR lorsqu’un blocage survient dans le cerveau. Une tumeur, un caillot de sang ou le rétrécissement d’une partie du parcours du LCR à la naissance font partie des causes de l’hydrocéphalie non communicante.</li> </ul> <p>On dit d’une personne qui vient au monde avec une hydrocéphalie qu’elle souffre d’une «hydrocéphalie congénitale».</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul> <li>L’hydrocéphalie est une accumulation anormale de liquide céphalorachidien (LCR) dans les ventricules à l’intérieur du cerveau.</li> <li>L’hydrocéphalie est traitée par la chirurgie (une intervention) qui vise à installer une dérivation ou créer une ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule (VETV).</li> <li>Si vous observez des signes indiquant que la dérivation ou la VETV ne fonctionne pas adéquatement, composez le 911 ou appelez le service d’urgence immédiatement. Votre enfant a besoin d'une attention médicale. </li> </ul><h2>Signes d’hydrocéphalie</h2> <p>Pour savoir si votre enfant souffre d'une hydrocéphalie, le médecin l’évaluera et procédera à quelques examens.</p> <h3>Signes d’hydrocéphalie chez un bébé</h3> <p>Votre bébé pourrait avoir certains ou l’ensemble des symptômes suivants :</p> <ul> <li>manque d’appétit;</li> <li>vomissements (régurgitations);</li> <li>léthargique (difficile à réveiller) ou n’est pas aussi éveillé et alerte que d’habitude;</li> <li>tête de grande taille (votre médecin de famille peut mesurer sa tête);</li> <li>la fontanelle (partie molle) bombée sur le dessus de la tête;</li> <li>semble irritable (pleure facilement et sans raison apparente)</li> <li>crises;</li> <li>veines du crâne très visibles;</li> <li>déplacements lents (par exemple, se retourne ou s’assoie lentement);</li> <li>yeux à demi fermés, lorsque les yeux semblent regarder toujours vers le bas et ne semblent pas pouvoir regarder vers le haut. </li> </ul> <h3>Signes d’hydrocéphalie chez un enfant</h3> <p>Votre enfant pourrait avoir certains ou l’ensemble des symptômes suivants :</p> <ul> <li>maux de tête;</li> <li>nausées et vomissements;</li> <li>fatigue (dort plus que d’habitude, a de la difficulté à rester éveillé, ne veut pas s’amuser comme d’habitude);</li> <li>semble irritable;</li> <li>changements de personnalité, de comportement ou de rendement scolaire;</li> <li>perte de coordination;</li> <li>convulsions;</li> <li>changements dans la vision.</li> </ul><h2>L’hydrocéphalie est diagnostiquée à l’aide d’un tomodensitogramme, un IRM ou une échographie</h2> <p>L’hydrocéphalie est souvent diagnostiquée avec des tests d’imagerie. Ces tests comprennent le tomodensitogramme (scanner), l’imagerie par résonance magnétique (IRM) ou l'échographie. Ces technologies permettent aux médecins d’obtenir différentes images de ce qui se passe à l’intérieur du cerveau. Ces tests d’imagerie peuvent révéler un blocage ou une accumulation de LCR.</p> <p>À l’aide de l’IRM et de l'échographie, l’hydrocéphalie est parfois diagnostiquée avant la naissance de l’enfant.</p> <p>Puisque les tomodensitogrammes et l’IRM nécessitent qu’une personne demeure immobile lorsque les images sont prises, on doit mettre certains enfants sous sédation afin de les aider à ne pas bouger pendant les tests.</p><h2>Traitement de l’hydrocéphalie par la chirurgie</h2> <p>Il n’existe aucun médicament efficace contre l’hydrocéphalie. La plupart des enfants doivent subir une opération de chirurgie. Le but est de diminuer la pression dans le cerveau en créant un autre parcours pour que le LCR puisse circuler et être absorbé à l’extérieur du cerveau. </p> <p>Il y a deux types de chirurgies pour l'hydrocéphalie.</p> <ul> <li>Le traitement le plus commun est l’installation d’une dérivation ou shunt. Le shunt sert à déplacer le fluide d’une zone dans laquelle il y a trop de LCR vers une zone où il peut être absorbé dans le corps. </li> <li>Certains enfants qui souffrent d’une hydrocéphalie non communicante peuvent subir une opération appelée ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule (VETV). Cette chirurgie permet de créer une ouverture en vue de permettre au LCR de circuler comme il se doit à l’intérieur et autour du cerveau. </li> </ul> <p>Les deux chirurgies sont décrites ci-dessous.</p> <h2>Chirurgie de dérivation (shunt)</h2> <p>Le traitement le plus commun de l’hydrocéphalie est l’installation chirurgicale d’une dérivation, c'est-à-dire un tube mou et souple.</p> <p>La partie supérieure de la dérivation est placée dans les espaces des ventricules contenant du fluide dans le cerveau. Ce tube est attaché à une valve qui contrôle le flux de LCR dans la dérivation. Le tube est ensuite glissé sous la peau vers une zone du corps où le liquide peut être absorbé. L’une de ces zones est située sur la paroi de la cavité abdominale (le péritoine). On l’appelle une dérivation ventriculo-péritonéale (shunt VP). </p> <p>Plus rarement, la dérivation connecte le cerveau aux autres parties du corps.</p> <ul> <li>Une dérivation du cerveau vers le revêtement du poumon (la plèvre) à l’intérieur du thorax est appelé une dérivation ventriculo-pleurale.</li> <li>Une dérivation du cerveau vers les veines qui arrivent au cœur est appelé une dérivation ventriculo-atriale.</li> </ul> <h3>Il y a différents types de tubes et de valves de dérivation</h3> <p>Le neurochirurgien de votre enfant décidera du type de tube de dérivation qui est préférable pour votre enfant. Toutes les dérivations permettent seulement au LCR de circuler dans une direction. Certaines dérivations peuvent également comporter une bulle ou un « réservoir » près de la partie supérieure par où le médecin peut prélever des échantillons de LCR afin de les analyser. </p> <p>Il arrive qu’un type particulier de dérivation qui permet d’ajuster la pression soit requis. Il s’agit d’un robinet de dérivation programmable. Cela permet au chirurgien de programmer la dérivation pour contrôler la quantité de LCR drainé. Il ne faut pas oublier que le réglage de la pression de cette dérivation peut être changé par un aimant. L’IRM utilise de gros aimants et, par conséquent, si votre enfant a besoin d'une IRM, mentionnez-le au médecin d’abord. Il pourrait être nécessaire de faire une radiographie après l’IRM afin de s'assurer que les réglages de la pression n’a pas été modifié.</p> <h3>Pendant l’intervention</h3> <p>Votre enfant est conduit à la salle d’opération et placé sous anesthésie générale. Il ne ressentira aucune douleur pendant l’intervention. </p> <p>La partie de la tête à l’abdomen (ventre) est frottée avec un savon spécial. Le chirurgien pratique des incisions (coupures) sur la tête et l’abdomen. La dérivation est glissée directement sous la peau. L’extrémité ventriculaire (partie supérieure) de la dérivation est insérée dans un petit trou percé par le chirurgien dans le crâne, puis glissée avec précaution dans le ventricule. L’extrémité abdominale (partie inférieure) est insérée dans une petite ouverture dans l’abdomen. Les incisions sont ensuite refermées par des agrafes ou des points de suture. </p> <p>L’intervention dure 1 à 2 heures.</p> <h2>Chirurgie de ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule (VETV)</h2> <p>Une ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule est le deuxième type de chirurgie effectuée pour certains enfants qui souffrent d’hydrocéphalie. Votre chirurgien vous dira si cette opération convient à votre enfant. </p> <p>Pendant une VETV, le chirurgien fait une ouverture sur le plancher du ventricule à la base du cerveau. Cela débloque le LCR à l’intérieur du ventricule. Il peut maintenant circuler à l’intérieur et autour du cerveau, comme il se doit. </p> <p>Cela signifie que l’enfant n’aura pas besoin d’une dérivation, remplacée plutôt par l’ouverture faite par le chirurgien pendant l’intervention. Il est tout de même très important d’observer votre enfant afin de repérer des signes qui révèlent que la pression s’accumule à nouveau, puisqu’il est possible que la VETV échoue ou se bloque. Si les signes réapparaissent, il est important de communiquer immédiatement avec le chirurgien pour que votre enfant soit examiné.</p> <h3>Pendant l’intervention de VETV</h3> <p>Votre enfant est conduit à la salle d’opération et placé sous anesthésie générale. Votre enfant ne ressentira aucune douleur pendant l’intervention. Une incision est faite sur la tête. Une tige spéciale munie d’une caméra est insérée dans le ventricule. Le chirurgien utilise la caméra pour voir la partie du ventricule qui doit être ouverte. Une fois que l’ouverture est faite, le chirurgien est en mesure de voir si le LCR circule alors à l’extérieur du ventricule. </p> <p>Si le chirurgien n’est pas en mesure de procéder à la VETV en toute sécurité, il insèrera plutôt une dérivation. Les incisions sont ensuite refermées à l’aide d’agrafes ou de points de suture.</p> <p>L’intervention dure 1 à 2 heures.</p> <h2>Après l’intervention de dérivation ou de VETV</h2> <p>Votre enfant est transporté à la salle de réveil de l’Unité de soins post-anesthésie (USPA). Votre enfant se réveillera peu après l’intervention. Vous pourrez le voir dès qu’il sera réveillé. Il passera 1 ou 2 heures à l’USPA afin de se rétablir de l’anesthésie. Votre enfant retournera ensuite à sa chambre à l’unité de neurochirurgie.</p> <p>Votre enfant aura un bandage sur la tête. Si on lui a posé une dérivation, il aura un deuxième bandage sur l’abdomen ou sur la poitrine, selon le type de dérivation. </p> <p>L’infirmier examinera souvent votre enfant. Il observera également s'il se réveille facilement, même pendant la nuit.</p> <p>Votre enfant aura une perfusion intraveineuse (i.v.) après la chirurgie jusqu’à ce qu’il puisse boire de façon adéquate.</p> <p>Votre enfant pourrait passer un tomodensitogramme après la chirurgie afin de s’assurer que la taille des ventricules a diminué et, si votre enfant avait besoin d’une dérivation, que la position de la dérivation est adéquate. </p> <h3>Douleur après l’intervention</h3> <p>Après l’intervention, il se peut que votre enfant ressente de la douleur aux sites opérés. L’infirmier lui donnera des médicaments pour enfants par la bouche toutes les quatre heures. Cela devrait contrôler la douleur. Dans le cas contraire, dites-le à l’infirmier.</p> <p>Votre enfant pourrait également apprendre d’autres façons de contrôler la douleur, comme souffler des bulles ou la respiration profonde. Demandez à l’infirmier ou à l'éducateur en milieu spécialisé de vous aider à montrer à votre enfant comment s’y prendre.</p> <p>Le chirurgien vous dira quand votre enfant pourra reprendre ses activités normales, telles que s’asseoir et marcher. Votre enfant pourra rentrer à la maison lorsqu’il sera rétabli.</p><h2>Rentrer à la maison après l’intervention</h2> <p>La dérivation pourrait cesser de fonctionner adéquatement après votre retour à la maison. Il arrive que le tube se bloque, se détache ou se brise. De plus, la croissance de votre enfant pourrait faire sortir que le tube de l’abdomen. Il pourrait également s’infecter.</p> <p>De même, une VETV ne garantie pas que l’hydrocéphalie de votre enfant ne reviendra jamais. Si vous remarquez que les signes de l’hydrocéphalie reviennent, il est très important que vous appeliez immédiatement le chirurgien.</p> <h3>Si la dérivation ou la VETV ne fonctionne pas convenablement, appelez immédiatement pour obtenir une assistance médicale</h3> <p>Votre enfant a besoin de soins médicaux immédiats si vous constatez des signes ou des symptômes liés à un problème de dérivation ou à une VETV qui aurait échoué.</p> <p>Si la dérivation ou la VETV de votre enfant ne fonctionne pas convenablement, la pression dans le cerveau reviendra. Les signes qui indiquent que la VETV ne fonctionne pas sont les mêmes que ceux de l’hydrocéphalie (présentés ci-avant). Il se peut que votre enfant affiche les mêmes signes qu’avant l’installation de la dérivation, ou d’autres signes pourraient apparaître.</p> <p>Les signes d’une infection de la dérivation comprennent :</p> <ul> <li>une boursouflure ou une rougeur de la peau autour du tube et des incisions;</li> <li>de la fièvre;</li> <li>une raideur au cou;</li> <li>du fluide qui s’écoule de l’incision;</li> <li>une perte d’appétit ou une mauvaise alimentation;</li> <li>une sensation générale de malaise;</li> <li>des maux de tête;</li> <li>des douleurs abdominales (ventre).</li> </ul> <p>Si votre enfant ressent l’un de ces symptômes, composez le 911 ou appelez le service d’urgence local immédiatement. Le mauvais fonctionnement d’une dérivation, une infection ou l’échec d’une VETV qui n’est pas traité rapidement et de façon adéquate peut causer un coma et, possiblement, la mort..</p> <h3>Retirer les agrafes ou les points de suture</h3> <p>La façon d’enlever les agrafes ou les points de votre enfant dépend du type utilisé. Le chirurgien ou l’infirmier vous précisera le type d’agrafes qui a été utilisé.</p> <ul> <li>Si votre enfant a des agrafes ou des points de suture qui doivent être retirés, votre médecin de famille devra le faire. Les points de suture doivent être retirés environ 7 à 10 jours après l’intervention. Les agrafes devraient être retirées environ 10 jours après l'intervention. Le chirurgien ou l’infirmier vous dira quand il faut les retirer.</li> <li>Si des agrafes ont été utilisées, on vous donnera un outil spécial à remettre à votre médecin de famille pour qu'il retire les agraphes.</li> <li>Si votre enfant a des points de suture résorbables (qui disparaissent tout seuls), vous pouvez rendre visite à votre médecin de famille afin qu’il examine la cicatrice de l’incision, mais les points n'auront pas être retirés.</li> </ul><h2>Suivi après l’intervention</h2> <p>Le chirurgien devra revoir votre enfant pour une visite de suivi en clinique environ 6 semaines après le retour de votre enfant à la maison. La date du rendez vous pourrait vous être transmise lorsque votre enfant quittera l’hôpital. Dans le cas contraire, veuillez appeler à la clinique de neurochirurgie afin d’obtenir un rendez-vous.</p> <h2>Si vous avez des questions</h2> <p>Le chirurgien de votre enfant peut répondre à toutes vos questions d’ordre médical. Assurez vous d’écrire vos questions avant de rencontrer le chirurgien. L’infirmier de votre enfant ou une infirmière praticienne peut répondre aux autres questions. </p> <p>Le nom du neurochirurgien de votre enfant est :</p> <p>Le nom de l’infirmier praticien de votre enfant est :</p> <p>Leur numéro de téléphone est :</p> <h2>À long terme : au fur et à mesure que votre enfant grandit et devient adulte</h2> <p>Un enfant qui souffre d’une hydrocéphalie a fréquemment besoin de voir un médecin afin de s’assurer que la dérivation ou la VETV fonctionne correctement et que la pression ne recommence pas à s’accumuler. Plusieurs membres d’une équipe vous aideront et vous orienteront au fur et à mesure que votre enfant grandit et se développe. Vous devriez encourager votre enfant à participer davantage à ce processus continu.</p>https://assets.aboutkidshealth.ca/akhassets/Hydrocephalus_static_MED_ILL_EN.pngHydrocéphalie et traitement : Shunts et ventriculostomie endoscopique du troisième ventricule

Thank you to our sponsors

AboutKidsHealth is proud to partner with the following sponsors as they support our mission to improve the health and wellbeing of children in Canada and around the world by making accessible health care information available via the internet.