AboutKidsHealth (FR) AKH-Article

 

 

Tumeurs des cellules germinalesTTumeurs des cellules germinalesGerm cell tumoursFrenchNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Cette page offre une brève description d’un type de tumeur cérébrale qui s’appelle la tumeur des cellules germinales.</p><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales se produisent surtout dans la région au-dessus de l’hypophyse (région suprasellaire) ou la région pinéale de l’encéphale. Il existe deux principaux types de tumeurs des cellules germinales : les germinomes et les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses. Les germinomes sont le type le plus fréquent. Environ 60 à 70 % des tumeurs des cellules germinales sont des germinomes purs.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Il existe deux principaux types de tumeurs des cellules germinales : les germinomes et les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses.</li> <li>Pendant le développement normal d'un bébé, une cellule germinale se développe en un ovule (chez les filles) ou un spermatozoïde (chez les garçons), mais ces cellules migrent vers la mauvaise partie du corps du bébé, comme l'encéphale, où elles évoluent en tumeur.</li> <li>Les symptômes des tumeurs des cellules germinales dépendent de l’emplacement dans l’encéphale où elles vont se loger.</li></ul>
Central nervous system germ cell tumours (CNS-GCT)CCentral nervous system germ cell tumours (CNS-GCT)Central nervous system germ cell tumours (CNS-GCT)EnglishNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2022-01-10T05:00:00Z9.8000000000000053.90000000000001682.00000000000Health (A-Z) - ConditionsHealth A-Z<p>This page gives an overview of the different types of germ cell tumours, what the symptoms of germ cell tumours are and how they are treated.</p><p>Germ cell tumours occur mostly in the area of the pituitary gland (suprasellar region) and/or in the pineal region of <a href="/article?contentid=1307&language=english">the brain</a>. The most common type of central nervous system germ cell tumour (CNS-GCT) is the germinoma. About 60% to 70% of germ cell tumours are germinomas.</p><h3>Non-germinomatous germ cell tumours (NGGCT)</h3><p>Non-germinomatous germ cell tumours (NGGCT) are sometimes called “mixed malignant germ cell tumours”. They are also called “secreting tumours” because they may secrete, or produce, a substance called alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) and/or human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). </p><p>The terminology surrounding NGGCTs can be very complex and confusing. If your child is diagnosed with a NGGCT, their doctor may mention that the tumour consists of one or more of the following components:</p><ul><li>Embryonal carcinoma</li><li>Choriocarcinoma</li><li>Yolk sac tumour</li><li>Immature teratoma</li><li>Mature teratoma</li></ul><p>Each of these components must be addressed during treatment. </p><h3>Germinomas</h3><p>Germinomas do not secrete AFP and they may secrete hCG in lower levels with different threshold used in Europe (lower than 50 international units per litre, or IU/L) in America (lower than 100 IU/L) and Japan (lower than 200 IU/L). Germinomas may have sometimes mature teratoma components.</p><p>If germinomas contain anything other than mature teratoma germ cell tumour components, then it is not a germinoma. Instead, it is classified as a NGGCT, even if it contains some germinoma elements.</p><h2>Key points</h2><ul><li>In Europe and North America, two main types of germ cell tumours are distinguished: germinomas and non-germinomatous germ-cell tumours.</li><li>Symptoms of germ cell tumours depend on the part of the brain where the tumour is located.</li><li>Diagnosis of a germ cell tumour does not always require a biopsy.</li><li>Both germinoma and non-germinomatous germ cell tumours have relatively high treatment success rates. </li></ul><h2>What are symptoms of germ cell tumours?</h2><p>Symptoms of germ cell tumours depend on the part of the brain where the tumour is located.</p><p>Germ cell tumours located in the pineal region generally have symptoms of increased intracranial pressure:</p><ul><li>Headaches increasing in frequency and severity </li><li>Nausea and vomiting increasing in frequency and severity </li><li>Blurred vision</li><li>Unusual movements of the eyes</li></ul><p>Germ cell tumours located in the basal ganglia can cause weakness on one side of the body.</p><p>Germ cell tumours in the suprasellar region cause problems with vision and often diabetes insipidus. Diabetes insipidus is not related to diabetes (mellitus) and a condition where the person pees and drinks a lot. There may be other endocrine problems such as delayed or precocious (early) puberty, which is the onset of puberty in girls and boys younger than eight or nine years of age respectively. Most children treated for a germ cell tumour in the suprasellar region of the brain will need multiple hormone replacement for the rest of their lives.</p><h2>What causes germ cell tumours?</h2><p>There are different scientific theories about what may cause a germ cell tumour but none of them has been proven with certainty.</p><h2>How many other children have a germ cell tumour?</h2><p>Germ cell tumours make up about 3% of paediatric tumours of the central nervous system in Europe and the United States. However, they are much more prevalent in Asian countries. In Japan, germ cell tumours make up 18% of brain tumours in people younger than 20 years old.</p><p>Germ cell tumours affect mostly teenagers and young adults. They are most often diagnosed around 13 to 15 years of age. They are much more common in boys than in girls.</p><p>In about half of children with a germ cell tumour, the tumour is located in a part of the brain called the pineal region. The second most common location is the suprasellar region (30%). About 10-20% will affect both locations; occurrence in the basal ganglia is very rare. </p><h2>How are germ cell tumours diagnosed?</h2><p>Unlike many other types of brain tumours, the diagnosis of a germ cell tumour does not always require testing of tumour tissue from a <a href="/article?contentid=1335&language=english">biopsy</a> (taking a small sample of tissue from the tumour). If a <a href="/article?contentid=1270&language=english">magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) </a>or <a href="/article?contentid=1272&language=english">computerized tomography (CT) scan</a> shows a tumour growing in the pineal or suprasellar region of the brain, this may already suggest that it is a germ cell tumour.</p><p>The most important type of testing is to determine whether tumour markers are increased. The presence of increased tumour markers is enough to confirm a diagnosis of germ cell tumour. Most brain tumour scientists agree that if a child has both evidence of a midline brain tumour on MRI and positive tumour markers as described above, there is no need for a biopsy to confirm the diagnosis.</p><p>When tumour markers are increased, the doctor can decide to start treatment without further testing.</p><p>If a child shows evidence of brain tumour without the elevated tumour markers, most doctors will do a biopsy to determine what type of tumour the child has.</p><h3>What is staging?</h3><p>Staging helps to determine the prognosis, or expected effect the tumour will have on your child, as well as the type of treatment plan that is most appropriate for your child.</p><p>Germ cell tumours can spread, and comprehensive staging investigations, including MRI of the brain and spine, analysis for tumour markers and investigation of CSF for malignant cells, are needed to determine the extent of disease.</p><h2>How are germ cell tumours treated?</h2><p>Once the health-care team has a clear understanding of what is causing your child’s symptoms, a meeting with the team will be set up to talk about results and the treatment plan. Remember that it is helpful to bring something to take notes with, such as a paper and a pen or laptop, at each meeting with this team. It is important to have the child’s primary caregivers in this meeting, for example both parents. </p><p>The treatment team may include a neurosurgeon, a neuro-oncologist, radiation oncologist, a nurse practitioner or nurse, and a social worker. During the meeting, they will explain which doctor is responsible for your child’s treatment, and the roles of everyone who is there. Other team members may be involved such as a dietician, pharmacist, occupational therapist, and physiotherapist, depending on your child’s needs. Every team member has their role in your child’s care, and everyone works together to make your child feel better. </p><p>The doctor will explain the type of tumour that your child has, based on what the team has learned through diagnostic testing. You will learn the expected effect this tumour will have on your child in the upcoming months and years, based on what is known about the tumour. This is called the prognosis. </p><p>The team may talk about placing your child on a protocol, which is a treatment plan for germ cell tumours. You will need to consent (agree) to the plan for the treatment to begin. Teenaged patients may be asked for their consent as well.</p><p>Your team will also talk to you about placing an IV line called a <a href="/article?contentid=52&language=english">central line</a>, this will help doctors give the treatments in a safer way and avoid multiple pokes for blood tests. You will get more information about the line insertion in details during the meeting. </p><p>The treatment of germ cell tumours depends on the type of germ cell tumour. <a href="/article?contentid=1351&language=english">Surgery</a> is required for a type of germ cell tumour called teratoma. For all other types of germ cell tumours, aggressive surgery may not be necessary. </p><p>Germinomas are very sensitive to <a href="/article?contentid=1357&language=english">chemotherapy</a> and <a href="/article?contentid=1353&language=english">radiation</a>. Non-germinomatous GCT require both chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Chemotherapy is generally given before radiation.</p><p>In North America, the treatment of a <strong>germinoma</strong> may involve one of the following:</p><ul><li>A combination of chemotherapy and whole ventricular irradiation</li><li>Craniospinal radiation to the brain and spine</li></ul><p>The treatment of a <strong>NGGCT</strong> may involve one of the following:</p><ul><li>Chemotherapy and craniospinal radiation</li><li>Chemotherapy and focal radiation</li></ul><p>Surgery may be recommended for NGGCTs if they do not respond completely to chemotherapy.</p><p>The use of chemotherapy is sometimes complicated in children with diabetes insipidus, particularly when the chemotherapy given requires hydration. This can trigger an imbalance in the fluid electrolytes in the child’s body.</p><p>The testing of tumour markers continues regularly throughout treatment and follow-up.</p>

 

 

 

 

Tumeurs des cellules germinales1317.00000000000Tumeurs des cellules germinalesGerm cell tumoursTFrenchNeurology;OncologyChild (0-12 years);Teen (13-18 years)BrainNervous systemConditions and diseasesAdult (19+)NA2009-07-10T04:00:00Z000Flat ContentHealth A-Z<p>Cette page offre une brève description d’un type de tumeur cérébrale qui s’appelle la tumeur des cellules germinales.</p><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales se produisent surtout dans la région au-dessus de l’hypophyse (région suprasellaire) ou la région pinéale de l’encéphale. Il existe deux principaux types de tumeurs des cellules germinales : les germinomes et les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses. Les germinomes sont le type le plus fréquent. Environ 60 à 70 % des tumeurs des cellules germinales sont des germinomes purs.</p><h2>À retenir</h2> <ul><li>Il existe deux principaux types de tumeurs des cellules germinales : les germinomes et les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses.</li> <li>Pendant le développement normal d'un bébé, une cellule germinale se développe en un ovule (chez les filles) ou un spermatozoïde (chez les garçons), mais ces cellules migrent vers la mauvaise partie du corps du bébé, comme l'encéphale, où elles évoluent en tumeur.</li> <li>Les symptômes des tumeurs des cellules germinales dépendent de l’emplacement dans l’encéphale où elles vont se loger.</li></ul><h3>Tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses</h3><p>On nomme parfois les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses des tumeurs mixtes malignes des cellules germinales. On les appelle aussi « tumeurs sécrétrices », car elles peuvent sécréter une substance nommée « alpha-foetoprotéine ». Les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses peuvent aussi sécréter une hormone nommée gonadotrophine chorionique humaine (hCG) à des taux supérieurs à 50 ui/l.</p><p>La terminologie des tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses peut être très complexe et porter à confusion. Si votre enfant reçoit un diagnostic de tumeur des cellules germinales non germinomateuse, son médecin pourrait mentionner que la tumeur consiste en une moins une des composantes suivantes :</p><ul><li>carcinome embryonnaire;</li><li>choriocarcinome;</li><li>tumeur de la vésicule ombilicale;</li><li>tératome immature;</li><li>tératome mature.</li></ul><p>Il faut tenir compte de chacune de ces composantes pendant le traitement. Il s’agit de la terminologie utilisée en Europe et en Amérique du Nord; par conséquent, il est utile de se familiariser avec les termes que le médecin de votre enfant pourrait utiliser. Il est possible que d’autres termes soient utilisés dans les pays asiatiques.</p><h3>Germinomes</h3><p>Les germinomes purs ne sécrètent pas d’alpha-foetoprotéine et ils peuvent sécréter de la hCG à des taux inférieurs à 50 iu/l.</p><p>Les germinomes peuvent aussi contenir au moins une des composantes mentionnées ci-dessus pour les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses. Toute tumeur des cellules germinales qui n’est pas pure se nomme une tumeur des cellules germinales non germinomateuse, même si elle comprend certains éléments liés aux germinomes.</p><h2>À propos des marqueurs de tumeurs</h2><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses produisent des substances nommées marqueurs de tumeurs que l’on peut détecter dans le sang ou le liquide céphalorachidien (le liquide qui se trouve dans l’encéphale et la moelle épinière, aussi appelé LCR). Le hCG et l’alpha-foetoprotéine, dont nous avons déjà traité, sont des exemples de ces marqueurs de tumeurs. On les nomme ainsi parce qu’on peut les mesurer et on peut utiliser leurs taux comme marqueur de certaines tumeurs pendant le traitement et le suivi. L’alpha-foetoprotéine est un marqueur des tumeurs de la vésicule ombilicale et la hCG est un marqueur du choriocarcinome.</p><p>Les germinomes qui ne contiennent pas de choriocarcinome peuvent aussi mener à de légères augmentations de la hCG. Habituellement, cette augmentation est de moins de 50 iu/l. Dans la plupart des pays occidentaux, les tumeurs des cellules germinales dont le taux de hCG est inférieur à 50 iu/l se nomment des germinomes; les tumeurs des cellules germinales dont le taux de hCG est supérieur à 50 iu/l se nomment des tumeurs des cellules germinales non germinomateuses.</p><p>Toute augmentation de l’alpha-foetoprotéine indique que la tumeur des cellules germinales est non germinomateuse.</p><p>Certains autres marqueurs de tumeurs font l’objet d’examens, particulièrement dans l’études des germinomes. Le s-kit est l’un de ces marqueurs sous étude.</p><p>Les marqueurs de tumeurs peuvent connaître une augmentation à la fois dans le sang et le LCR, ou encore soit dans le sang, soit dans le LCR. C’est pourquoi les médecins recommandent que l’on mesure ces marqueurs de tumeurs à la fois dans le sang et le LCR, dans la mesure du possible.</p><h2>Quelles sont les causes des tumeurs des cellules germinales?</h2><p>Pendant le développement normal d'un bébé, une cellule germinale se développe dans un ovule (chez les filles) ou un spermatozoïde (chez les garçons). Dans de rares cas, ces cellules demeurent dans une mauvaise partie du corps du bébé, comme l'encéphale, où elles peuvent produire une tumeur. Ces tumeurs peuvent se répandre à d'autres parties de l'encéphale ou de la moelle épinière par le liquide céphalorachidien (LCR).</p><h2>Combien d’autres enfants ont une tumeur des cellules germinales?</h2><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales représentent environ 3 % des tumeurs pédiatriques du système nerveux central en Europe et aux États-Unis. Elles sont toutefois beaucoup plus prévalentes dans les pays asiatiques. Au Japon, les tumeurs des cellules germinales représentent 18 % des tumeurs cérébrales chez les personnes âgées de moins de 20 ans.</p><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales affectent surtout les adolescents et les jeunes adultes. La plupart du temps, on les diagnostique chez des personnes âgées entre 13 et 15 ans. Elles sont beaucoup plus fréquentes chez les garçons que chez les filles.</p><p>Chez environ la moitié des enfants qui présentent une tumeur des cellules germinales, la tumeur se situe dans une partie de l’encéphale nommée la région pinéale. L’autre moitié des tumeurs des cellules germinales se trouvent dans diverses parties de l’encéphale.</p><p>Approximativement 50 à 65 % des tumeurs des cellules germinales sont des germinomes et le reste d’entre elles sont non germinomateuses.</p><h2>Quels sont quelques-uns des symptômes des tumeurs des cellules germinales?</h2><p>Les symptômes des tumeurs des cellules germinales dépendent de l’endroit de l’encéphale où elles se trouvent.<br></p><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales situées dans la région pinéale causent habituellement les symptômes suivants liés à une pression intracrânienne accrue :</p><ul><li>céphalées le matin;</li><li>nausée et vomissements le matin;</li><li>vision trouble;</li><li>mouvements inhabituels des yeux.</li></ul><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales situées dans les noyaux gris centraux causent une faiblesse d’un côté du corps.</p><p>Les tumeurs des cellules germinales dans la région suprasellaire (partie supérieure de l’encéphale) causent des troubles de vision et des problèmes endocriniens comme le diabète insipide. Il pourrait y avoir d’autres signes endocriniens spécifiques comme une puberté précoce, c’est-à-dire le déclenchement de la puberté chez des filles et des garçons âgés de moins de huit ans. La plupart des enfants traités pour une tumeur des cellules germinales dans la région suprasellaire de l’encéphale auront besoin du remplacement de multiples hormones pendant le reste de leur vie.</p><p>Pour obtenir de plus amples renseignements sur les problèmes endocriniens, veuillez consulter la section « Croissance, développement et effets hormonaux » du présent centre de ressources.</p><p>Pour en savoir davantage :</p><ul><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1331&language=French">Diagnotic de tumeurs des cellules germinales </a></li><li> <a href="/Article?contentid=1347&language=French">Traitement de tumeurs des cellules germinales</a></li> </ul><br>

Nous tenons à remercier nos commanditaires

AboutKidsHealth est fier de collaborer avec les commanditaires suivants, qui nous aident à accomplir notre mission, qui consiste à améliorer la santé et le mieux-être des enfants canadiens et étrangers, en leur donnant accès sur Internet à des renseignements sur les soins de santé.

Nos Sponsors